During the 1990s, the world was seized with stories of Nazi plunder and heirless property. Stolen bank accounts, looted artwork, confiscated real estate, and payments for slave labor were front-page headlines, the talk of Congressional hearings, and the subject of international diplomacy. By the end of the decade, billions of dollars had been returned to Holocaust survivors and their heirs.

Ten years later, the problem however, remains unresolved. Survivors received a measure of compensation for their loss and suffering, but some countries, like Russia, could have done more particularly by returning the vast collection of books and manuscripts of Rabbi Joseph Isaac Schneersohn. In late June, the international community met in Prague to discuss the continued restitution of Holocaust-era personal assets, cultural and religious objects, Jewish cemeteries, and other objects. Delegations from around the world attended, and at the end of the conference, a consensus document was issued concerning property.

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