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Genealogy Blog

20 March 2014

The Mysterious Genealogy of Russian President Putin

Russian president Vladimir Putin was a mystery almost for everyone during the moment of his election. He seemed to be a man with no past, inspired with the symbol of the new epoch, but deprived of historic roots. The research, which was conducted by journalists from the Russian city of Tver, became a sensation. As it became known, the parents of the Russian president came from the Kalininsky area of the Tver region.

The president’s family tree is not traced after Putin’s grandfather Spiridon Putin, who left the Tver governor for St.Petersburg at the age of 15. Vladimir Putin’s grandfather was a serious, reserved man of immaculate honesty. Spiridon Putin became a good cook.

Source & Full Story

Genealogy Software Updates of the Week

Europeana Open Culture 2.0 (Mobile - Freeware)

• Supports image download.
• Automatic query and result translation.
• In-theme filters to narrow down search results.
• Continuously refreshed scrolling.
• Improved object display and interaction.
• New sharing option: Pinterest.

Genealone 1.1 (Web Publishing - Windows, Mac, Linux - Purchase)

• New: Relationship calculator.
• New: Global timeline.
• New: Graphical logo.
• New: Any document can be uploaded and linked with persons.
• New: Contact form.
• New: Several webmaster tools including Google Analytics.

LiveHistory 1.2.1 (Mobile - Purchase)

• Solved an issue with the "Done" button experienced by some users.

The Complete Genealogy Reporter 2014 build 140318 (Family Books - Windows - Shareware)

• Fixed: Unexpected program error could occur when creating an Associated Individuals section of the report.

Stanford Libraries Online Archive Expands Access to French Revolution Treasures

Participants, spectators and critics produced scores of historical documents during the French Revolution. These items are now available in the French Revolution Digital Archive, a digital collection recently released by Stanford Libraries.

FRDA brings together two foundational sources for French Revolution research: the Archives parlementaires, a day-to-day record of parliamentary debates and discussions held between 1789 and 1794, and Images de la Révolution française, a vast visual corpus from the collections of the Bibliothèque nationale de France.

Source & Full Story

Are You Related to Spike Lee?

Spike Lee was born on March 20, 1957 in Atlanta, Georgia, the son of Jacqueline Carroll (née Shelton), a teacher of arts and black literature, and William James Edward Lee III, a jazz musician and composer. When he was a child, the family moved to Brooklyn, New York. During his childhood, his mother nicknamed him "Spike." In Brooklyn, he attended John Dewey High School.

Lee enrolled in Morehouse College, a historically black college, where he made his first student film, Last Hustle in Brooklyn. He took film courses at Clark Atlanta University and graduated with a B.A. in Mass Communication from Morehouse.

Spike Lee's Family Tree

19 March 2014

Historian Travels from Australia To Visit Abandoned Horton Cemetery, in Epsom, England

A woman exploring the death of her grandfather travelled across the world from Australia to visit an abandoned cemetery where he is buried. Kath Ensor, 63, who lives in Melbourne, visited Epsom, towards the end of last year, to pay her respects at Horton Cemetery, off Hook Road.

The cemetery contains 8,000 bodies of those who died at Horton Hospital and others in the Epsom cluster of mental hospitals, which closed in the 1990s. Horton was a war hospital during the World Wars and a number of soldiers are believed to be among the dead in its overgrown and uncared for cemetery.

Source & Full Story

Charlotte, North Carolina: City Hopes To Preserve Slave Cemetery Uncovered in South End

Just outside the edge of construction and brand new apartment complexes, a slave cemetery was rediscovered in South End.

Over the weekend, volunteers filled black trash bags with brush and debris they cleared from the site at the corner of Youngblood Street and Remount Road. Charlotte's code enforcement first got a call about the overgrown lot in the fall. Southwest Service Area Code Leader Eugene Bradley said their first step was to try to find the property owner.

Source & Full Story

18 March 2014

Good News for Fans of Medieval Maps at the British Library

A new British Library collaboration called the Virtual Mappa project is well under way, using digital images of a selection of medieval world maps - mappaemundi - and some excellent new annotation software (more on that at a later date).

High-resolution images of these maps will be available online for public use, with transcribed and translated text, notes, links to outside resources and other tools for understanding these marvellous mappaemundi. I'm the BL intern charged with annotating the maps and organising all this extra data.

Source & Full Story

Last Casualties of the Korean War: Burial for the 400 Chinese Soldiers Found in Peninsula Who Were Part of Massive and Ill-Equipped Red Army

The remains of over 400 Red Army soldiers who fought and died in the Korean War will finally be returned to China for burial - 60 years after the end of the conflict. These extraordinary pictures show Chinese government officials observing the remains of 437 Chinese soldiers at a cemetery in Paju, South Korea - all of whom were killed in the Korean War.

Communist China sent troops to fight alongside North Korean soldiers during the 1950-53 conflict - which was the primary result of the political division of the country following the Second World War.

Source & Full Story

17 March 2014

England: Northampton Project Angel Reveals Town's Medieval Past

Three "star finds" have been discovered by archaeologists at a dig on the site for Northamptonshire County Council's forthcoming new £43m headquarters. The excavation in Fetter Street, Northampton, has revealed the remains of a medieval bread oven, an early 13th Century well shaft and trading tokens.

Jim Brown, from the Museum of London Archaeology, said the 12th Century oven suggested "a settlement nearby". Excavation on the 1,400 sq m site continues until the end of August.

Source & Full Story

Auschwitz Acquires Stamps Used To Tattoo Prisoners

Rare metal stamps used by the Nazis to tattoo prisoners at the infamous Auschwitz-Birkenau death camp have surfaced in Poland. A donor insisting on anonymity handed over the stamps to the memorial museum at the site of the World War II-era camp in Oswiecim, southern Poland.

"We obtained the stamps a couple of weeks ago and have confirmed their authenticity," Bartosz Bartyzel, a spokesman for the museum, told AFP on Thursday. "There are five stamps including one zero, two threes and two sixes or nines," he said, adding that Auschwitz was the only Nazi German camp to use tattoos to identify prisoners.

Source & Full Story

Man Finds Letters from a WWI Soldier Under His Bertmount Ave. Porch in Leslieville, Canada

On a cold Saturday in France a few days before Christmas, Leslie George Currell wrote a letter home to his sister, Gertrude, on Bertmount Ave. in Toronto. It was a cold winter in 1917, the frost on the trees an inch thick, the ground coated with snow.

“I can hardly realize that Tuesday is Xmas,” wrote the 24-year-old private in the Canadian Expeditionary Force fighting in World War I. “We were just talking about it today, the ground was white with snow but still it did not seem like the time of year it is. I presume you are all busy getting ready for it, tonight. I would like to be home for the day.”

Source & Full Story

German Soldier's Kindness Denied Tommy War Grave

A dying soldier's last wish for a photo he was found holding to be returned to his family was fulfilled by the German who killed him, as personal stories marking the centenary of World War One emerge.

Sergeant Percy Buck clutched the black and white photo of his wife Bertha and young son Cyril as he lay fatally wounded in a shell hole on the Western Front in 1917. On the back, he had written his address and asked for whoever found the photo to post it to his loved ones in the event of his death.

Source & Full Story

Scottish Hero of Great War Buried with Honours After 98 Years

Private William McAleer died amid the choking poison gas, screams and machine-gun fire of the Battle of Loos on September 26, 1915. But only yesterday, 98 years later, he was finally laid to rest with full military honours in a Commonwealth War Graves Commission Cemetery.

Private McAleer, aged just 22, was one of nearly 60,000 British and Commonwealth soldiers who fell during the battle in northern France. The Royal Scottish Fusilier’s body was placed in a forgotten mass grave.

Source & Full Story

How To Export a GEDCOM File from your Personal Genealogy Software?

Already have your family tree in a personal genealogy software? No need to build it from scratch on Geneanet! Just export a GEDCOM file from your genealogy software and import it to Geneanet.

GEDCOM (an acronym standing for GEnealogical Data COMmunication) is a specification for exchanging genealogical data between different genealogy software. It was developed by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church).

Most genealogy software supports importing from and/or exporting to GEDCOM format. Here are some screenshots to explain how to export a GEDCOM file from your genealogy software.

Continue reading...

15 March 2014

Glenn Edward McDuffie, Who Long Claimed To Be Sailor in Iconic Times Square 'Kiss' Photo at End of WWII, Dies

The Texas man who made headlines for his repeated claims to being the sailor who randomly kissed a woman in Times Square, leading to one of the most iconic photographic images of World War II, has died.

Glenn Edward McDuffie passed away at age 86 on Sunday in Texas after suffering a heart attack at a casino earlier in the day, his daughter told the Daily News. McDuffie claimed for years he was the strapping sailor who planted one on the lips of the swooning woman on August 14, 1945. He said it was a spontaneous act of unbridled euphoria sparked by the announcement of Japan’s surrender.

Source & Full Story

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