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Genealogy Blog

12 June 2014

Genealogy Software Updates of the Week

Family Get-To-Gether (Free) 1.2.1 (Mobile - Freeware)

• New option added to export descendant/ancestors tree and new option to export photos along with GEDCOM file.
• New option to export (or print) tree. Go to ’Tree’ page, press ‘Menu’ button, and select ‘Export’. 3rd party app required for print.
• New option to export members photos. Go to ‘My Families’ page, long-press on a family and select ‘Export GEDCOM’. Check ‘Export Photos’ option.
• Larger font is used in ‘Tree’ page for large display.
• Miscellaneous quality enhancements.

GEDexplorer 1.3 (Mobile - Purchase)

• Improved error checking for reading dates and note records.

Genealone 1.2 (Web Publishing - Windows, Mac, Linux - Purchase)

• Person edit form improved.
• New: Mapping.
• New: Custom HTML pages linkable to persons.
• New: Merging persons.
• New: Merging and editing places.
• New: Main menu configuration tool.
• New: New Places section.

My Family Tree 3.0.20.0 (Full Featured - Windows - Freeware)

• Removed the limit to the number of events which can be displayed in the timeline view.
• Fixed issue loading newly created files.

The Complete Genealogy Reporter 2014 build 140606 (Family Books - Windows - Shareware)

• The translations for "From" and "To" (dates) were absent for a number of languages, resulting in no qualifier being reported. This affected reports created in Catalan, Danish, Spanish, Finnish, French, Italian, Dutch, Norwegian and Portuguese. These qualifiers are now translated and reported correctly.
• URL references to image files in GEDCOM files created by Ancestry.com are now ignored because these incorrectly reference a web page, not the remotely stored image file. This avoids the very slow loading of such GEDCOM files.

Top 100 Irish Last Names Explained

IrishCentral.com has put together a list of the top 100 common Irish surnames with a little explanation of where these names come from. Whether you're looking to trace your family crest or trying to trace your family roots this list will point you in the right direction.

From Aherne to Whelan here is this top 100 Irish names: Aherne - (Ó hEachtighearna/Ó hEachthairn) (each, steed tightearna, lord). Originally Dalcassian, this sept migrated from east Clare to Co. Cork. In County Waterford the English name Hearn is a synonym of Hearn.

Source & Full Story

11 June 2014

Queens Abolitionist's Tombstone Mysteriously Appears in Professor's Yard

A Queens College professor returning home from vacation found a mysterious gravestone laying in his yard and was set to break it into pieces when he realized how special it was. Allan Rudman says he got back to his Flushing home last week to find the gravestone sitting by his fence. As a geologist, he initially planned to hit it with a hammer and break it into pieces.

The gravestone was that of famous abolitionist Wilson Rantus, who died in 1861. He was a free middle-class black man who lived in Queens in the 1800s.

Source & Full Story

10 June 2014

Earliest Known Portrait of an African-American Slave Comes to US

A rare oil painting of an African slave from circa 1733 has been acquired by Virginia’s Jamestown-Yorktown Foundation, which runs the history museums at the Jamestown Settlement and Yorktown Victory Center. The portrait is one of a pair of paintings by William Hoare of Bath that shows the earliest known depictions of an African slave in the American colonies.

The portrait depicts Ayuba Suleiman Diallo, an educated African from a prominent family of Muslim clerics who was kidnapped on the Gambia River in 1731 and sold into slavery in colonial Maryland.

Source & Full Story

'Incredibly Important' Medieval Find in Wales

Archaeologists says they have discovered an "incredibly important" medieval convent, cemetery and Tudor mansion in Ceredigion. The location of Llanllyr nunnery in the Aeron Valley had been a mystery until now.

The convent, founded by Lord Rhys ap Gruffudd in 1180, was a daughter house of the Strata Florida abbey, a former Cistercian monastery which was of immense importance to Wales during the Middle Ages.

Source & Full Story

Are You Related to Judy Garland?

Born Frances Ethel Gumm on June 10, 1922, in Grand Rapids, Minnesota, Garland was the youngest child of Ethel Marion (née Milne; November 17, 1893 – January 5, 1953) and Francis Avent "Frank" Gumm (March 20, 1886 – November 17, 1935). Her parents were vaudevillians who settled in Grand Rapids to run a movie theatre that featured vaudeville acts.

Named after both her parents and baptized at a local Episcopal church, "Baby" (as she was called by her parents and sisters) shared her family's flair for song and dance.

Judy Garland's Family Tree

9 June 2014

10th-Century Viking king May Have Been Discovered in Scotland

In 2005 archaeologists working in eastern Scotland came across the skeleton of a warrior buried in a saint’s cemetery. A historian now believes these might be the remains of Olaf Guthfrithsson, King of Dublin and Northumbria from 934 to 941.

The remains were uncovered in the village of Auldhame, East Lothian, which is home to an Anglo-Saxon church and cemetery.

Source & Full Story

Police Baffled By 144-Year-Old Gravestone of Infant that mMysteriously Appeared in a Backyard Nearly 200 Miles from Cemetery

Police in Indiana have spent the past 12 years puzzling over a 19th-century tombstone that somehow ended up in a resident's backyard. With the help of social media and an enterprising Good Samaritan, the Greenwood Police Department now has come one step closer to solving the mystery.

In June 2002, a Greenwood woman was digging in her garden when she stumbled upon a 144-year-old gravestone.

Source & Full Story

Woman Receives WWI Love Letters 95 Years After They Were Written To Her Grandmother

An Oregon woman is now discovering the love that blossomed nearly a century ago between her grandmother and grandfather, all thanks to the kind determination of a total stranger.

It all started in 1918 when Nathan Byrd, serving in the military in France, wrote 25 letters to his wife Lota Byrd at home in Phoenix, Arizona. The story might have ended there, until a woman named Sheryl Caliguire found Nathan's letters to Lota in a Southern California car port 30 years ago, and held on to them all this time.

Source & Full Story

World War Two Skeletons Washed from Marshall Islands Graves 'By Rising Seas'

The skeletons of 26 Japanese soldiers who died during World War II have been washed from their graves in the low-lying Marshall Islands, prompting warnings by the nation that its future is under threat from rising sea levels.

The nation of 70,000 people revealed the extent of the devastation during United Nations climate change talks in Germany, saying global warming was ruining crops and that sea rises were overrunning parts of the islands. The nation’s 1,000-plus islands are only about six feet above sea level – and scientists are predicting a three- to six-foot rise in sea levels by the end of the century.

Source & Full Story

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6 June 2014

The Importance of Maps in Genealogical Research

Mary Girard, local genealogist and historian, knows the importance of maps, especially when it comes to tracking down early settlers.

Maps that provide various kinds of information from the location of waterways, roads to settlements in the early days in Kentucky can easily be found. All the early maps from the formation of the state and counties shows how each county changed over time and they can be found online on the Kentucky State Secretary Land Office in Frankfort.

Source & Full Story

5 June 2014

Genealogy Software Updates of the Week

Ancestral Quest 14.20 (Full Featured - Windows - Purchase)

• Check Repair: Made improvements to find and fix some additional issues.
• Translations: Added some comments to some abbreviated labels to help translators with the translations.
• Web Page Creation: When creating a web page, if you asked for living descendants, but wanted to show "Living" rather than the name, this worked fine for the descendant, but if a spouse was living, it showed the name of spouse. Fixed. Now shows "living" for a living spouse.
• Book Reports: If you had pictures for people, there was a small chance that the page break would lose a few words. Fixed.

Branches for iPad 1.3 (Mobile - Purchase)

• Adjusted fonts and minor layout changes.
• Added ability to load more non-standard GEDCOMS.
• Speed up of GEDCOM analysis and loading.

Brother's Keeper 7.0.18 (Full Featured - Windows - Purchase)

• Sometimes on Edit, if you Rearrange Spouses, the spouse names would not show until you stop BK and restart BK. This update fixes that problem.

My Family Tree 3.0.19.0 (Full Featured - Windows - Freeware)

• Updated translations.
• Fixed issue saving LDS facts.

Chester Nez, Last of Original Navajo Code Talkers of World War II, Dies

For more than two decades, Chester Nez kept silent about his role as one of the original Navajo code talkers responsible for developing an unbreakable code during World War II.

His death Wednesday at his home in Albuquerque, New Mexico, at age 93 was lamented by the Marine Corps as the end of an era -- for both the country and its armed forces. "We mourn his passing but honor and celebrate the indomitable spirit and dedication of those Marines who became known as the Navajo code talkers," the Marines said in a statement.

Source & Full Story

Oldest Known Pair of Pants Unearthed

The world’s first-known pants were recently excavated from tombs in western China, reports a new study.

The pants, which date from 3,000 to 3,300 years ago, are tattered, but are surprisingly stylish, combining attractive form with function. Made out of wool, the trousers feature straight-fitting legs and a wide crotch. The pants were discovered in an excavation led by archaeologists Ulrike Beck and Mayke Wagner of the German Archaeological Institute in Berlin.

Source & Full Story

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