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Genealogy Blog

11 September 2014

Egypt: Project to Preserve National Archives Under Way

The National Archives of Egypt, founded in Cairo in 1828, is one of the oldest in the world.

It dates back to the 19th century when Mohamed Ali Pasha constructed a place in the Cairo Citadel (El-Qalaa) to preserve official records and named it Daftarkhana (House of Documentation).

Source & Full Story

9 September 2014

Toronto’s First Casualty of World War I

In a war rife with brutality, it is unreasonable to categorize one soldier’s demise as more harrowing than another’s, or his grace in dying as more admirable than that of those who fell around him.

So the horrible circumstances surrounding the death of Bertram Denison, Toronto’s first casualty of the First World War, and the kindness he demonstrated in his final days, didn’t exceed those of his fellow servicemen. They exemplified them.

Source & Full Story

8 September 2014

7 Unusual Cemeteries in New York City

Cemeteries are not just for the grieving or the morbid. They are often bucolic places secreted away amid the noise of the city. They can even offer settings for reflection and rest, and some attract tourists seeking the tombstones of the departed famous.

There are dozens of cemeteries in the five boroughs, from the majestic to the humble. Here are seven that are among the most unusual.

Source & Full Story

How To Trace the Places Where Your Ancestors Lived in Your Geneanet Family Tree?

Most of archival records - especially censuses - say where your ancestors resided in.

Tracing where your ancestors lived is very interesting and it might help you to overcome a brick wall.

In your Geneanet family tree, you can add as many facts as you need, including the residence names.

Here is how to do it.

Continue reading...

6 September 2014

Are You Related to Roger Waters?

George Roger Waters was born on 6 September 1943, the younger of two boys, to Mary (née Whyte; 1913-2009) and Eric Fletcher Waters (1913-1944), in Great Bookham, Surrey.

His father, the son of a coal miner and Labour Party activist, was a schoolteacher, a devout Christian, and a Communist Party member. In the early years of the Second World War, his father was a conscientious objector who drove an ambulance during the Blitz. He later changed his stance on pacifism and joined the British Army, and as a 2Lt. of the 8th Royal Fusiliers died at Aprilia, between Anzio and Rome in Italy, on 18 February 1944, when Roger was five months old.

Roger Waters' Family Tree

5 September 2014

World War I: German Soldier Otto Strube's Photographs Captured Life Behind the Lines

When German photographer Otto Strube was called upon to fulfil his responsibilities of military service at the start of World War I, his camera went along with him. Now his family have shared his photographs, offering us a remarkable view of the German perspective of the war.

Otto served as a soldier in the German 44th Reserve Field Artillery Regiment and according to his grandson, ABC journalist Bernie Bowen, was involved in many of the battles Australians also fought on the Western Front.

Source & Full Story

Fluke Discovery of World War I Officer’s Diary Under the Floorboards During a House Renovation

Ripping up floorboards in old houses usually yields nothing more historic than rot and rats. But the State Library of NSW is the richer for what Glen Butler found while renovating his Manly home.

It was a WWI diary penned by Sydney-born military officer Geoffrey Gaden while fighting the Germans in the trenches of France in 1916. The almost pristine diary was secreted under the floorboards of an upstairs bedroom and evidently forgotten before Mr Butler bought the house about three years ago.

Source & Full Story

4 September 2014

Genealogy Software Updates of the Week

Brother's Keeper 7.0.27 (Full Featured - Windows - Purchase)

• Fixed a problem in version 7.0.26 which could cause a problem with the search index if you changed the spelling of the name of an existing person.
• Faster search times when searching for a name in a large database.
• The two other Views from Edit will show Married (civil) and Married (religious) and not just the normal Married event.

Family Chronicle 4.9.59 (Mobile - Purchase)

• New iOS7 look and feel.
• New iPhone homepage and issue details.
• Restore purchases fix.

Genealone 1.3.1 (Web Publishing - Windows, Mac, Linux - Purchase)

• Several bugs have been fixed and the code has been optimized.
• Design has been slightly improved.
• Links for creating missing father and/or mother are displayed to editors and administrators on person’s pages.
• Persons, places and sources merging have been improved.

Pocket Genealogist 4.09A03 Public Beta (Mobile - Purchase)

• Recognition of TMG v9.

The Family Tree of Family for Android 1.9.6 (Mobile - Purchase)

• Updated genealogical map.

A New Project from Yale Invites Viewers To Explore Some 175,000 Images of America in the 1930s and '40s

For a singular image of the Great Depression and the roughness of those years, it's hard to do much better than Dorothea Lange's 1936 photograph of Florence Owens Thompson, two of her children tucking their faces over her shoulders, a baby in her lap.

Where that image comes from, there are many, many more: around 175,000 surviving portraits of America between 1935 and 1945 taken by the photographers of the government's Farm Security Administration. The Library of Congress, which houses the collection, has, remarkably, digitized all the negatives and tagged the records with loads of data, such as who took the picture and where it was taken.

Source & Full Story

World War I: Australian Teenage Girl Maud Butler Cut Hair, Dressed as Soldier and Stowed Away on Troopship

A teenage girl from the Hunter Valley coalfields was so desperate to be a part of Australia's war effort that she cut her hair, dressed as a soldier and stowed away on a troopship.

The exploits of Maud Butler, a resourceful 16-year-old waitress with a sense of adventure, are being researched by historian Professor Victoria Haskins. As part of her study, Professor Haskins is researching Maud's expedition, which she says runs several chapters. Here, Professor Haskins writes about Maud's initial run-in with authorities.

Source & Full Story

3 September 2014

War Against Japan Archives Cover Disastrous Defense of Nanking

The eighth part of an archive series on the Second Sino-Japanese War on Monday covered the Battle of Nanking (Nanjing) in 1937, in which Japanese troops captured the Republic of China capital and unleashed a six-week orgy of slaughter.

Starting on Aug. 25, the archive series is being released on the website of China's State Archives Administration, one battle per day, in a drive to raise awareness of the war, known in China as the War of Resistance Against Japan.

Source & Full Story

2 September 2014

More than 750 Korean War Remains Found this Year

The South Korean military has excavated this year the remains of 753 fallen soldiers who fought in the 1950-53 Korean War, the defense ministry said Monday.

In a four-month project that began in April to find remains of missing service personnel, some 46,000 soldiers dug out sites in 56 regions across the country to recover the bodies, according to the ministry.

Source & Full Story

1 September 2014

London’s Imperial War Museum Revisits Horrors of World War I

For the next four years, Britain will commemorate in a wide-ranging series of events and programs the centenary of the country’s entry into the First World War on Aug. 4, 1914, when it declared war against Germany.

“The centerpiece of our commemorations,” in the words of Prime Minister David Cameron, is the renovation of the Imperial War Museum London.

Source & Full Story

Woman Unearths Past of Forgotten Arizona Indian Cemetery

A dusty, barren field in the shadow of a busy Arizona interstate was for decades a place where children played freely, teenagers spooked themselves on Halloween and locals dumped trash, seemingly unaware of the history beneath them.

Inside cotton sacks, burlap bags and blankets buried in the ground are the remains dating back to the 1930s of stillborn babies, tuberculosis patients, and sick and malnourished Native Americans from Winslow and the nearby Navajo and Hopi reservations.

Source & Full Story

Archives New Zealand and National Library Open the Files on the First World War

More than 141,000 First World War service files are now available online, adding to the wealth of information detailing New Zealanders experience of the war made available by Archives New Zealand and the National Library.

In possibly the largest and most complicated digitisation project in New Zealand’s history, Archives New Zealand staff identified over 141,000 First World War files, scanned the often crumbling, fragile pages and then digitised them and published them online.

Source & Full Story

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