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Genealogy Blog

17 June 2014

Ashes of WWII Chinese Soldiers from Burma Buried in Yunnan

Twenty-two urns containing the ashes of soldiers from the Chinese Expeditionary Forces who fought against the Japanese during World War II were transported from Burma and reburied in China’s Yunnan Province last week.

In 1942, two brigades of Chinese soldiers from the Chinese Expeditionary Forces were part of the Allied Forces led by US commander Gen Joseph "Vinegar Joe" Stilwell.

Source & Full Story

16 June 2014

Dickinson Museum Center Creates Online Collection with 8,000 Photos; Thousands More Yet To Be Processed

In the 1930s, when Dickinson’s college was literally out of town — separated from the city by open spaces and a now long-gone golf course — amateur and professional photographers were taking pictures of those and other sights.

Now, those thousands of images, some 19th century, but mostly 20th-century — everything from landscapes to Dickinson businesses, to wedding pictures, team photos and ranchers at work — have landed on one spot on the Internet.

Source & Full Story

Geneanet Retires Its Old Family Tree Software

On June 30, 2014, Geneanet will retire its old family tree software and all the members will have to use the new one.

Some months ago, we have released a new family tree software. It's not only faster and easier to use, but it's also more effective in ways that our users have been requesting. Since then, the old family tree software was still available.

This transitional period will expire on June 30, 2014, and all the Geneanet members will have to use the new family tree software.

15 June 2014

Are You Related to Waylon Jennings?

Waylon Arnold Jennings was born on June 15, 1937 in Littlefield, Texas, the seat of Lamb County, the son of Lorene Beatrice (née Shipley) and William Albert Jennings.

His original birth name was Wayland, meaning land by the highway, but it was changed after a Baptist preacher visited Jennings's parents and congratulated his mother for naming him after the Wayland Baptist University in Plainview, Texas.

Waylon Jennings' Family Tree

13 June 2014

Genes Found in Nature Yield 1918-Like Virus with Pandemic Potential

An international team of researchers has shown that circulating avian influenza viruses contain all the genetic ingredients necessary to underpin the emergence of a virus similar to the deadly 1918 influenza virus.

Searching public databases, the researchers, led by Yoshihiro Kawaoka of the University of Wisconsin-Madison, identified eight genes from influenza viruses isolated from wild ducks that possessed remarkable genetic similarities to the genes that made up the 1918 pandemic flu virus.

Source & Full Story

Pre-1989 Communist Documents To Be Transferred To National Archives of Hungary

The Institute of Political History (PTI) will have to transfer its archives stemming from the period 1944-1989 to the National Archives as the Kuria, Hungary’s supreme court, rejected the institute’s appeal on Wednesday, national dailies Nepszabadsag and Nepszava said on Thursday.

The archives concerned contain the documents of the Hungarian Socialist Workers’ Party and its predecessors, other left-wing political and social organisations as well as trade unions.

Source & Full Story

Family Tree DNA Reaches a Historic Milestone: Over 1,000,000 DNA Tests Processed

This historic amount includes Family Tree DNA’s tests as well the processing of public participation samples for National Geographic’s Genographic Project. Family Tree DNA is the Genographic Project’s genetic testing partner.

The million-test milestone was reached this week during the company’s Father’s Day sale, which includes the Family Finder test currently discounted at the affordable price of $79.

Source & Full Story

Tuam Mother and Baby Home: The Trouble with the Septic Tank Story

"I never used that word 'dumped'," Catherine Corless, a local historian in Co Galway, tells The Irish Times. "I never said to anyone that 800 bodies were dumped in a septic tank. That did not come from me at any point. They are not my words."

The story that emerged from her work was reported this week in dramatic headlines around the world. Corless, who lives outside Tuam, has been working for several years on records associated with the former St Mary’s mother-and-baby home in the town. Her research has revealed that 796 children, most of them infants, died between 1925 and 1961, the 36 years that the home, run by Bon Secours, existed.

Source & Full Story

12 June 2014

Genealogy Software Updates of the Week

Family Get-To-Gether (Free) 1.2.1 (Mobile - Freeware)

• New option added to export descendant/ancestors tree and new option to export photos along with GEDCOM file.
• New option to export (or print) tree. Go to ’Tree’ page, press ‘Menu’ button, and select ‘Export’. 3rd party app required for print.
• New option to export members photos. Go to ‘My Families’ page, long-press on a family and select ‘Export GEDCOM’. Check ‘Export Photos’ option.
• Larger font is used in ‘Tree’ page for large display.
• Miscellaneous quality enhancements.

GEDexplorer 1.3 (Mobile - Purchase)

• Improved error checking for reading dates and note records.

Genealone 1.2 (Web Publishing - Windows, Mac, Linux - Purchase)

• Person edit form improved.
• New: Mapping.
• New: Custom HTML pages linkable to persons.
• New: Merging persons.
• New: Merging and editing places.
• New: Main menu configuration tool.
• New: New Places section.

My Family Tree 3.0.20.0 (Full Featured - Windows - Freeware)

• Removed the limit to the number of events which can be displayed in the timeline view.
• Fixed issue loading newly created files.

The Complete Genealogy Reporter 2014 build 140606 (Family Books - Windows - Shareware)

• The translations for "From" and "To" (dates) were absent for a number of languages, resulting in no qualifier being reported. This affected reports created in Catalan, Danish, Spanish, Finnish, French, Italian, Dutch, Norwegian and Portuguese. These qualifiers are now translated and reported correctly.
• URL references to image files in GEDCOM files created by Ancestry.com are now ignored because these incorrectly reference a web page, not the remotely stored image file. This avoids the very slow loading of such GEDCOM files.

Top 100 Irish Last Names Explained

IrishCentral.com has put together a list of the top 100 common Irish surnames with a little explanation of where these names come from. Whether you're looking to trace your family crest or trying to trace your family roots this list will point you in the right direction.

From Aherne to Whelan here is this top 100 Irish names: Aherne - (Ó hEachtighearna/Ó hEachthairn) (each, steed tightearna, lord). Originally Dalcassian, this sept migrated from east Clare to Co. Cork. In County Waterford the English name Hearn is a synonym of Hearn.

Source & Full Story

11 June 2014

Queens Abolitionist's Tombstone Mysteriously Appears in Professor's Yard

A Queens College professor returning home from vacation found a mysterious gravestone laying in his yard and was set to break it into pieces when he realized how special it was. Allan Rudman says he got back to his Flushing home last week to find the gravestone sitting by his fence. As a geologist, he initially planned to hit it with a hammer and break it into pieces.

The gravestone was that of famous abolitionist Wilson Rantus, who died in 1861. He was a free middle-class black man who lived in Queens in the 1800s.

Source & Full Story

10 June 2014

Earliest Known Portrait of an African-American Slave Comes to US

A rare oil painting of an African slave from circa 1733 has been acquired by Virginia’s Jamestown-Yorktown Foundation, which runs the history museums at the Jamestown Settlement and Yorktown Victory Center. The portrait is one of a pair of paintings by William Hoare of Bath that shows the earliest known depictions of an African slave in the American colonies.

The portrait depicts Ayuba Suleiman Diallo, an educated African from a prominent family of Muslim clerics who was kidnapped on the Gambia River in 1731 and sold into slavery in colonial Maryland.

Source & Full Story

'Incredibly Important' Medieval Find in Wales

Archaeologists says they have discovered an "incredibly important" medieval convent, cemetery and Tudor mansion in Ceredigion. The location of Llanllyr nunnery in the Aeron Valley had been a mystery until now.

The convent, founded by Lord Rhys ap Gruffudd in 1180, was a daughter house of the Strata Florida abbey, a former Cistercian monastery which was of immense importance to Wales during the Middle Ages.

Source & Full Story

Are You Related to Judy Garland?

Born Frances Ethel Gumm on June 10, 1922, in Grand Rapids, Minnesota, Garland was the youngest child of Ethel Marion (née Milne; November 17, 1893 – January 5, 1953) and Francis Avent "Frank" Gumm (March 20, 1886 – November 17, 1935). Her parents were vaudevillians who settled in Grand Rapids to run a movie theatre that featured vaudeville acts.

Named after both her parents and baptized at a local Episcopal church, "Baby" (as she was called by her parents and sisters) shared her family's flair for song and dance.

Judy Garland's Family Tree

9 June 2014

10th-Century Viking king May Have Been Discovered in Scotland

In 2005 archaeologists working in eastern Scotland came across the skeleton of a warrior buried in a saint’s cemetery. A historian now believes these might be the remains of Olaf Guthfrithsson, King of Dublin and Northumbria from 934 to 941.

The remains were uncovered in the village of Auldhame, East Lothian, which is home to an Anglo-Saxon church and cemetery.

Source & Full Story

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