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Genealogy Blog

18 September 2014

Link Found in Genetic Connection Between Modern Europeans and Native Americans

It has long been believed that modern Europeans descended from indigenous hunters and Middle Eastern farmers. But a new study suggests all Europeans today have DNA from a third mystery group: Ancient North Eurasians.

This group appears to have contributed DNA to present-day Europeans, as well as to the people who travelled across the Bering Strait into the Americas more than 15,000 years ago.

Source & Full Story

17 September 2014

Forgotten Ghost Ships Off Golden Gate Revealed

A team of NOAA researchers today confirmed the discovery just outside San Francisco's Golden Gate strait of the 1910 shipwreck SS Selja and an unidentified early steam tugboat wreck tagged the "mystery wreck."

The researchers also located the 1863 wreck of the clipper ship Noonday, currently obscured by mud and silt on the ocean floor.

Source & Full Story

Civil War Soldiers Buried as 'Unknowns' ID'd in Marietta, Georgia

The names of 350 Confederate soldiers buried as “Unknowns” in the Confederate Cemetery here will now be forever emblazoned on memorial walls facing their graves as a result of the work of a local historian.

A bronze statue of a Confederate soldier will be erected there soon as well. Brown Park now has four granite walls commemorating 1,150 Confederate soldiers buried in the adjacent Marietta Confederate Cemetery after two new memorial walls were installed.

Source & Full Story

15 September 2014

China Reveals Archives of Victory Against Japan in WWII

China released archives of an important military victory in 1939, in which the Chinese army killed more than 4,000 Japanese soldiers.

This is the 19th part of the series released daily by the State Archives Administration from Aug. 25, as the country marks the 69th anniversary of victory against Japan's aggression.

Source & Full Story

500 Child Skeletons Found in Workhouse Mass Grave Tell of Struggles During the Irish Great Hunger

Skeletons of over 500 children who died during the Great Hunger were found seven years ago buried in a mass grave within what was once the Kilkenny Union Workhouse. With over three years of research on their bones, bio-archaeologists have been able to uncover the children's harrowing stories and medical secrets.

The new study, funded by the Irish Research Council, is based upon the "skeletal manifestation of stress in child victims of the Great Hunger."

Source & Full Story

Check the Missing Facts in Your Geneanet Family Tree

Looking for an easy way to view missing facts in your family tree? Geneanet has a solution!

On Geneanet, you can automatically display a table where all missing facts are shown to focus research on important goals.

Here is how to do it.

Continue reading...

12 September 2014

Black Death Skeletons Unearthed in Peterborough, England

Developers building houses in Peterborough have unearthed a fascinating glimpse of the city's past.

They've discovered a huge burial ground in Midland Road containing the skeletons of at least 70 people. It's thought the remains could be victims of the Black Death. For centuries they lay undisturbed while above them life went on for successive generations of Peterboreans.

Source & Full Story

In Search of the Spanish Armada Off the Irish Coast

The Invincible Armada had been navigating its way through the wilderness of the North Atlantic.

On the dawn of September 7, 1588, the Duke of Medina Sidonia, captain of the San Martín and the commanding officer of the vast fleet Philip II had created to invade England, scanned the horizon. Low on water and provisions, he now faced the task of returning to Spain with 112 badly damaged vessels carrying around 3,000 wounded by sailing round Scotland, and then the west coast of Ireland.

Source & Full Story

Are You Related to Paul Walker?

Walker was born on September 12, 1973 in Glendale, California, and was the son of Cheryl (née Crabtree), a fashion model, and Paul William Walker III, a sewer contractor and a fighter who was a two-time Golden Gloves champion.

His ancestry was mostly English, with a smaller amount of German. His paternal grandfather, a professional boxer, had English immigrant grandparents. One of his grandfathers raced factory cars for Ford in the 1960s. The oldest of five siblings, Walker was raised primarily in the Sunland community of Los Angeles and attended high school in the San Fernando Valley, graduating from Sun Valley's Village Christian School in 1991.

Paul Walker's Family Tree

11 September 2014

Genealogy Software Updates of the Week

Brother's Keeper 7.0.29 (Full Featured - Windows - Purchase)

• Sometimes when adding a new person, a 'stop statement' error would happen. Fixed.
• If the option is turned on to ignore accented characters in a name search, it also works for Alternate Names also if that type of search is turned on. Fixed.

Family Get-To-Gether 1.2.3 (Mobile - Purchase)

• New options for ‘Calendar’ and daily events reminders.
• More ‘Events’ (Engagement, Marriage) and new ‘Filter’, and ’Sort’ options added for ‘Calendar’ page.
• New member’s information fields added: Phone, E-Mail.
• Miscellaneous quality enhancements.

Genealone for WordPress (Web Publishing - Windows, Mac, Linux - Purchase) NEW!

• Genealone WP is a plugin for WordPress which runs entire Genealone as a part of WordPress site or blog. Plugin has the same functions as standalone Genealone program including GEDCOM file import.

MacBridge for RootsMagic 6 (Other Tools - Mac - Purchase) NEW!

• MacBridge for RootsMagic 6 allows you easily install and run RootsMagic on your Mac in mere minutes with almost no additional setup or configuration. MacBridge for RootsMagic is different than other solutions you may be familiar with. For starters, it does not install Windows on your Mac. It also does not create a slow and bulky virtual computer. It runs right on your Mac, using your Mac file system.

Egypt: Project to Preserve National Archives Under Way

The National Archives of Egypt, founded in Cairo in 1828, is one of the oldest in the world.

It dates back to the 19th century when Mohamed Ali Pasha constructed a place in the Cairo Citadel (El-Qalaa) to preserve official records and named it Daftarkhana (House of Documentation).

Source & Full Story

9 September 2014

Toronto’s First Casualty of World War I

In a war rife with brutality, it is unreasonable to categorize one soldier’s demise as more harrowing than another’s, or his grace in dying as more admirable than that of those who fell around him.

So the horrible circumstances surrounding the death of Bertram Denison, Toronto’s first casualty of the First World War, and the kindness he demonstrated in his final days, didn’t exceed those of his fellow servicemen. They exemplified them.

Source & Full Story

8 September 2014

7 Unusual Cemeteries in New York City

Cemeteries are not just for the grieving or the morbid. They are often bucolic places secreted away amid the noise of the city. They can even offer settings for reflection and rest, and some attract tourists seeking the tombstones of the departed famous.

There are dozens of cemeteries in the five boroughs, from the majestic to the humble. Here are seven that are among the most unusual.

Source & Full Story

How To Trace the Places Where Your Ancestors Lived in Your Geneanet Family Tree?

Most of archival records - especially censuses - say where your ancestors resided in.

Tracing where your ancestors lived is very interesting and it might help you to overcome a brick wall.

In your Geneanet family tree, you can add as many facts as you need, including the residence names.

Here is how to do it.

Continue reading...

6 September 2014

Are You Related to Roger Waters?

George Roger Waters was born on 6 September 1943, the younger of two boys, to Mary (née Whyte; 1913-2009) and Eric Fletcher Waters (1913-1944), in Great Bookham, Surrey.

His father, the son of a coal miner and Labour Party activist, was a schoolteacher, a devout Christian, and a Communist Party member. In the early years of the Second World War, his father was a conscientious objector who drove an ambulance during the Blitz. He later changed his stance on pacifism and joined the British Army, and as a 2Lt. of the 8th Royal Fusiliers died at Aprilia, between Anzio and Rome in Italy, on 18 February 1944, when Roger was five months old.

Roger Waters' Family Tree

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