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Genealogy Blog

4 April 2014

The Bravest Street in England: Cul-de-Sac Where 161 Men Joined Up for WWI - and 50 Gave Their Lives for Their Country

On the eve of the First World War it was just another ordinary British street - a nondescript cul-de-sac of 60 terrace houses, home to dozens of hard-working blue-collar families.

But by November 1918, some 161 residents of Chapel Street in Altrincham had stepped up to serve their country in the trenches of the Great War. Of those 29 were killed in action while a further 20 would succumb to their injuries on their return. Such was its sacrifice that King George V called Chapel Street the 'bravest little street in England' for having provided so many volunteers.

Source & Full Story

Utah Prisoners Do Mormon Genealogy Research From Jail

William J. Hopkins already knew a bit about genealogy work when he arrived at the Utah State Prison in 1994, an interest that was sparked in his teens by an aunt who is a family historian.

Hopkins, 40, now spends two to three hours a day working on family history projects — his own and that of others — at the Family History Center at the prison’s Wasatch unit. He is an arbitrator; someone who reviews duplicate data entered by various indexers to ensure the information corresponds and then enters one copy into a database. Hopkins also tutors fellow inmates on how to do family research.

Source & Full Story

Swedes Find 200-Year-Old Gravestone in Living Room

A Swedish family renovating their living room was shocked to find a gravestone from the 1800s under the floorboards. The Nilsson family found the hefty gravestone tucked in under the floor. It measured almost two metres in length and was some 10 centimetres thick.

The family looked up the three names engraved on the headstone and found they belonged to people who'd likely owned the property in Fuglie, southern Sweden, in the late 1800s. The stone had the names of two men and one woman who died in 1843, 1851, and 1884 respectively.

Source & Full Story

3 April 2014

Genealogy Software Updates of the Week

Branches for iPad (Mobile - Purchase) NEW!

• Branches for iPad is the best and most unique family tree viewer available. No other viewer can do what Branches for iPad does. It is like Apple Maps™ for your family history and genealogy. You can see your entire family tree in a global view. Just zoom in to see all the "street level" details like relationships, events, photos, sources, notes and documents.

2 April 2014

Diaries Reveal New Details About Gas Attack on Irish Soldiers in 1916

Hundreds of Irishmen fighting for the British Army in World War 1 perished in a horrific German gas attack as their countrymen battled to end British rule in Ireland.

The National Archives in Kew has this week released war diaries from the 8th Battalion of the Royal Dublin Fusiliers, which reveal details of the deadly German attack that left 500 Irish soldiers dead.

Source & Full Story

Skolt Sámi Archives Candidate for UNESCO List

The National Archives Service of Finland and the Sámi Archives have proposed including the Skolt Sámi archives in the UNESCO Memory of the World Register. Only 301 items have been listed in the register so far.

The archives from Suonjel, Pechenga, are the most significant body of documentation in the cultural heritage of the Skolt Sámi. The oldest document in the archives dates to 1601 and the most recent document to 1775.

Source & Full Story

Library and Archives Canada Moves To Outsource National Catalogue

Library and Archives Canada is outsourcing AMICUS, the venerable free national catalogue that lists and describes its holdings and those of more than 1,300 libraries across Canada.

LAC proposes to use a sole-source contract to hire U.S.-based Online Computer Library Centre Inc. (OCLC), the world’s largest library co-operative, to replace the outdated system. Library and Archives signalled the long-anticipated move by publishing a detailed advance contract award notice on the government’s tender website last week.

Source & Full Story

1 April 2014

Tombstone Discovered at Tyler, Texas, Construction Site Given To Descendants

A tombstone that was discovered beneath an East Texas construction site has been given to a relative. Ron and Nelda Swinney claimed the stone Monday from the City of Tyler's Engineering Department.

The stone was found in January by crews working on the site of the Fair Plaza Parking Garage. City officials believe the site used to belong to a marble yard and that's why the stone was found along Elm and Broadway.

Source & Full Story

Rare and Important Declaration of Independence on Offer at Bonhams New York

Bonhams sale Treasures from The Caren Archive on April 7 will feature a rare and exceedingly important early newspaper printing of the Declaration of Independence as published in The New England Chronicle (Powars and Willis) on July 18, 1776 (est. $50,000-70,000).

The 4-page newspaper tied with Gill’s Continental Journal as the first Boston appearance of the Declaration of Independence. One can easily imagine the excitement among the city’s residents as they absorbed the enormity of the news contained therein.

Source & Full Story

Open Access Maps at New York Public Library

The Lionel Pincus & Princess Firyal Map Division is very proud to announce the release of more than 20,000 cartographic works as high resolution downloads. We believe these maps have no known US copyright restrictions.

To the extent that some jurisdictions grant NYPL an additional copyright in the digital reproductions of these maps, NYPL is distributing these images under a Creative Commons CC0 1.0 Universal Public Domain Dedication. The maps can be viewed through the New York Public Library’s Digital Collections page, and downloaded, through the Map Warper.

Source & Full Story

Meet the Photo Detective: Maureen Taylor

Maureen Taylor owes her path in life to something many people have trouble pronouncing. It’s called a daguerreotype, a kind of shiny metal image that hallmarked the beginnings of modern-day photography.

Taylor, who will serve as keynote speaker at the Saturday, April 26, segment of the Lancaster Family History Conference, sponsored by the Lancaster Mennonite Historical Society, literally fell in love with something that conveyed an impression of people stepping out of the past.

Source & Full Story

The Man Who Owns A Magna Carta

David Rubenstein, the private equity billionaire and philanthropist, slips easily into the role of learned scholar as he strolls down Pennsylvania Avenue in Washington, D.C., on his way to the National Archives.

The 64-year-old co-CEO of the Carlyle Group is carefully attired in a pin-striped suit and blue and white-polka-dot tie. He mentions the hidden river that runs under the pavement and lectures on the area’s transformation from a virtual ghetto to an awe-inspiring site of federal offices and monuments.

Source & Full Story

New on Geneanet : Send your GEDCOM File by Phone

We are proud to launch a new service for Geneanet members who are not familiar with computer.

You will be soon able to send your GEDCOM file by phone: just call our new service and say the content of the file.

Your file will be imported to your account so you can have a Geneanet family tree without having to perform computer tasks.



April Fool's Day

31 March 2014

1 in 4 Indians Believe India Fought Against UK in WWI

Over 1 in 4 Indians believe India was fighting the British and against the UK in the First World War.

As part of its commemoration to mark 100 years of the war, the British Council commissioned YouGov to carry out a survey among the adult populations of Egypt, France, Germany, India, Russia, Turkey and the UK to gauge their knowledge surrounding the war.

Source & Full Story

London Skeletons Reveal Secrets of the Black Death

Analysis of twenty-five skeletons uncovered in London’s Charterhouse Square during Crossrail’s construction works in March 2013 have provided evidence of the location of the second Black Death burial ground. It was established in 1348 to take the growing number of dead and is referenced in historical records as being located in what is now modern day Farringdon.

Due to the burial ground’s historical importance to London, exceptional levels of research analysis were carried out on the skeletons to understand the life and death of the inhabitants affected by the Black Death in the 14th and 15th centuries.

Source & Full Story

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