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Genealogy Blog

10 April 2014

Canada: Was Someone on Your Street Killed During WWI’s Battle of Vimy Ridge?

It’s been 97 years since the First World War Battle of Vimy Ridge, which began with a Canadian attack on April 9, 1917. The battle was a milestone for Canada, marking the first time that all the Canadian divisions in France had fought together as an independent formation.

In the larger picture, Vimy Ridge was part of a pattern of events that showed Canada’s growing independence from Britain, something that took place gradually over decades.

Source & Full Story

Top Secret MI5 Files of First World War Go Online

The National Archives of the UK is making over 150 top secret MI5 files available online for the first time. This forms part of The National Archives' First World War 100 programme of digitised releases and events to mark the centenary.

The files contain a wealth of material about organisations and individuals involved in espionage or under surveillance during the period of the First World War. They are part of the wider security service personal file series (file reference KV 2) held by The National Archives.

Source & Full Story

9 April 2014

Japan: Lost 1890 Imperial Rescript on Education Is Found

Linked with prewar militaristic education in Japan, the original 1890 Imperial Rescript on Education issued by Emperor Meiji (1852-1912) has been found about half a century after going missing, the education ministry said Tuesday.

The document, which was badly damaged in the 1923 earthquake that struck the Kanto region, disappeared after being was put on display at an exhibition in Tokyo in 1962.

Source & Full Story

8 April 2014

Message in Bottle Arrives After 101 Years

A message in a bottle tossed in the sea in Germany 101 years ago and believed to be the world's oldest has been presented to the sender's granddaughter, a museum said on Monday.

A fisherman pulled the beer bottle with the scribbled message out of the Baltic off the northern city of Kiel last month, said Holger von Neuhoff of the International Maritime Museum in the northern port city of Hamburg. "This is certainly the first time such an old message in a bottle was found, particularly with the bottle intact," he said.

Source & Full Story

7 April 2014

Developers and Preservationists Find Historic Common Ground in Miami

When an archaeologist unearths a significant find on the site of a multimillion-dollar development, it rarely ends with smiles and handshakes. But at Miami's Met Square development, where archaeologist Robert Carr recently discovered the remnants of a an ancient Tequesta Indian village, that's exactly what has happened.

Last night, the Miami City Commission approved an agreement hammered out in mediation last week between MDM Development Group and several private and governmental preservationist parties, and all sides agree that the solution is as historic as the site it preserves.

Source & Full Story

New Hampshire To Digitize Historic Records, Photos

Civil War nurse Sarah Low met Abraham Lincoln on April 20, 1864, writing in her diary that the president shook hands with everyone at a crowded White House reception. One year later, the Dover woman would see Lincoln again, this time as he lay in state in the rotunda of the U.S. Capitol.

"The flowers on the coffin that had been beautiful the day before were faded and it seemed forlorn that they had not been replaced by fresh ones," she wrote on April 20, 1865. "Lincoln's face looked very thin and shrunken, the face was dark and it seemed to me that he looked like a murdered man."

Source & Full Story

More Than 100 Headstones Vandalized, Some 'Irreplaceable' at Woodlawn Cemetery in Zanesville, Ohio

The names Clarence and Ernest are barely legible on one edge of the elaborately sculpted granite pillar that forms the Brush family headstone at Woodlawn Cemetery.

Clarence, who died at 2 years old, and Ernest, who died at 11 months, were both dead before the Civil War was over. Their father, the Rev. G.W. Brush, was buried on the same plot in 1865. The top of the Brush headstone now lies in the mud after it was vandalized Thursday night, along with more than 100 others, in an act Mayor Jeff Tilton called “unbelievable — unforgivable.”

Source & Full Story

Did Adolf Hitler Marry a Jewish Woman? DNA Tests 'Show Eva Braun Associated with Ashkenazi Jews'

Eva Braun, Adolf Hitler’s long-term lover who married the Nazi leader hours before their joint suicide in his Berlin bunker, may have had Jewish ancestry, ground-breaking DNA testing has found.

DNA analysis of hair samples from a hairbrush claimed to belong to Braun suggests that the fascist dictator responsible for the murder of millions of Jews may have unwittingly married a woman of semitic descent, in one of his final acts as the Third Reich crumbled.

Source & Full Story

Mystery Solved of Confederate Soldier in Beaufort National Cemetery, South Carolina

The answer to one of Beaufort County's oldest mysteries will be officially unveiled next month, along with a new gravestone for the only unknown Confederate soldier buried in Beaufort National Cemetery. The soldier is no longer unknown.

Pvt. Haywood Treadwell of North Carolina has received a new marker -- this one with his name on it, according to the Historic Beaufort Foundation. A ceremony for the public unveiling of the new gravestone will be May 10, part of a two-day symposium recognizing Confederate soldiers buried in the national cemetery.

Source & Full Story

Mission To Trace Descendants of WWI Soldier from New Zealand

A gift given by a New Zealand soldier fighting in World War 1 to a young English schoolgirl has not been forgotten, nearly a century on. And now the daughter of that schoolgirl is hoping to track down relatives of that soldier.

The Wanganui Chronicle was recently contacted by Christine Jermey, who lives in Norfolk, England. Mrs Jermey is looking for relatives of Private Mack Wereta, a soldier from Waitotara, who sent Mrs Jermey's mother, Violet Fryer, a little booklet in 1918.

Source & Full Story

National Archives of India Notified Recruitment for 15 Archival Assistant

National Archives of India, New Delhi under Ministry of Culture, Government of India issued notification inviting application for filling up 15 posts of Archival Assistant on contract basis for the period up to 31 March 2015 for the project on "Survey and Inspection of Records/ Records Rooms, Appraisal and Transfer of Public Records from various Ministries/ Departments/ Offices etc."

Interested candidates should send their applications, in the prescribed format, to the NIA office within 15 days from the date of publication of this advertisement in Employment News i.e. till 12 April 2014 as the advertisement was published in Employment News dated 29 March 2014 – 4 April 2014.

Source & Full Story

New on Geneanet: Sponsor a Friend or Family Member, and Get a Club Privilege Extra Month Free

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Select the 'Contacts > Sponsor a friend or family member' item in the drop down menu at the top right of the screen.

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Sponsored persons will be invited to try the Geneanet Club Privilege free for one month.

If they subscribe to the Club Privilege during the free trial, the remaining free weeks will be added to their 1-year or 2-year membership, and you will get an extra month free!

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5 April 2014

Are You Related to Bette Davis?

Ruth Elizabeth Davis, known from early childhood as "Betty", was born on April 5, 1908 in Lowell, Massachusetts, the daughter of Ruth Augusta "Ruthie" (née Favor) and Harlow Morrell Davis, a patent attorney; her sister, Barbara "Bobby", was born October 25, 1909.

The family was Protestant, of English, French, and Welsh ancestry. In 1915, Davis's parents separated and Betty and Bobby attended a Spartan boarding school called Crestalban in Lanesborough, which is located in the Berkshires.

Bette Davis' Family Tree

4 April 2014

Priceless Tapestry Which Depicts Victory Over French by Winston Churchill’s Ancestor the First Duke of Marlborough Is Restored for First Time in 300 Years

A priceless 300-year-old tapestry depicting the ‘finest hour’ of Winston Churchill’s most illustrious ancestor has undergone a major restoration for the first time. The work of art hangs at Blenheim Palace and tells the story of the 1st Duke of Marlborough’s victories over the French in the War of the Spanish Succession.

The Duke, John Churchill, was a brilliant military strategist and much like Winston Churchill two centuries later, led an Allied force to victory in Europe.

Source & Full Story

French Colonial Houses Discovered in St. Louis, Missouri

Archaeologists from the Missouri Department of Transportation are ecstatic over a discovery beneath the Poplar Street Bridge in St. Louis. They’ve uncovered the first physical evidence dating to when the French founded St. Louis in 1764.

The findings help confirm written documentation of St. Louis’ earliest European settlers and shed new light on the people who live here. Michael Meyer is an archaeologist with MoDOT and the principal investigator of the department’s work in St. Louis.

Source & Full Story

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