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16 April 2014

Scotland Gets Ready To Celebrate Battle of Bannockburn's 700th Anniversary

Music, culture, ancestry, food, drink and fight re-enacting will make the 700th anniversary of the Battle of Bannockburn a memorable one.

Bannockburn Live on June 28-29 will see hundreds of artists and clan members unite for a festival at the Stirling battlefield where Robert the Bruce’s army annihilated the English, led by Edward II, and paved the way for Scottish independence.

Source & Full Story

4 April 2014

The Bravest Street in England: Cul-de-Sac Where 161 Men Joined Up for WWI - and 50 Gave Their Lives for Their Country

On the eve of the First World War it was just another ordinary British street - a nondescript cul-de-sac of 60 terrace houses, home to dozens of hard-working blue-collar families.

But by November 1918, some 161 residents of Chapel Street in Altrincham had stepped up to serve their country in the trenches of the Great War. Of those 29 were killed in action while a further 20 would succumb to their injuries on their return. Such was its sacrifice that King George V called Chapel Street the 'bravest little street in England' for having provided so many volunteers.

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2 April 2014

Diaries Reveal New Details About Gas Attack on Irish Soldiers in 1916

Hundreds of Irishmen fighting for the British Army in World War 1 perished in a horrific German gas attack as their countrymen battled to end British rule in Ireland.

The National Archives in Kew has this week released war diaries from the 8th Battalion of the Royal Dublin Fusiliers, which reveal details of the deadly German attack that left 500 Irish soldiers dead.

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31 March 2014

1 in 4 Indians Believe India Fought Against UK in WWI

Over 1 in 4 Indians believe India was fighting the British and against the UK in the First World War.

As part of its commemoration to mark 100 years of the war, the British Council commissioned YouGov to carry out a survey among the adult populations of Egypt, France, Germany, India, Russia, Turkey and the UK to gauge their knowledge surrounding the war.

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Hungarian WWI Soldiers Heroes, Not Only Victims, Says Defence Minister

Hungarian soldiers who fell in World War I were not only victims, but heroes as well, the Hungarian defence minister said in western Hungary on Sunday, at a commemoration of the 100th anniversary of the outbreak of the war.

The example of these of our heroes, their personal sacrifice as well as their loyalty, are also part of a decision taken in a referendum later in 1923 by the locals in Narda expressing their wish to belong to Hungary, said Csaba Hende in the village located on the border with Austria.

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24 March 2014

French Say First Australian To Die in WWI Was Sydney’s Lieutenant William Malcolm Chisholm

French authorities believe they have identified the first Australian to have died during World War I as they prepare to honour the sacrifice made by the then “young nation” from the other side of the world.

The Australian War Memorial has long listed the first Australian fatalities of the Great War as being sailors from the Australian Navy and Military Expeditionary Force during the landing on German New Guinea in September 1914.

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13 March 2014

WWI Diaries Tell How Dummy Troops Fooled the Germans

As shells rained down on No Man’s Land and poisonous gas swirled into the trenches, a company of British soldiers stood firm. They were the timber Tommies of the First World War and they proved a vital tool in the battle to keep the Germans guessing.

The wooden cut-outs made to resemble live soldiers on the move were positioned above the trenches to trick the enemy into concentrating their defences in one area, or provoking them to open fire while an attack was launched from another direction.

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12 March 2014

WW1 German Soldier Recalls Moment He Bayoneted Foe To Death

The German Army of the Kaiser consisted of 800,000 conscripts. There were hardly any professional soldiers. Amongst these 800,000 men they had ten thousand who were called One Year’s Volunteers. That means mostly students and men with higher certification of education.

The medical students had to serve only for half a year with the Infantry. And then, after they were qualified the next half year as doctors, as Medical Officers.

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10 March 2014

The Forgotten Indian Soldiers of WWI’s European Battlefields

Thousands of kilometres from home, on First World War battlefield in France, an Indian soldier composed a letter. “There is no telling whether the war will be over in two years or in three, for in one hour 10,000 men are killed. What more can I write?”

His name, like the names of so many other Indian soldiers on those battlefields, has disappeared from public memory. But his despondency, amid a war that he was dragged into, survived in his letter.

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3 March 2014

Australian World War I Dead To Be Honoured in Light Spectacular

The names of each of the 62,000 Australians who died in World War I will be emblazoned, one by one, onto the stones of the Hall of Memory at the Australian War Memorial over the next four years.

The projection of each of the names will be visible all the way down Anzac Avenue and across Lake Burley Griffin, and descendants will be advised when their fallen relative will be commemorated in light. Each name will be projected for 30 seconds on 19 occasions over the next four years, the war memorial's director, Brendan Nelson, says.

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19 February 2014

Drought Contributed to Typhus Epidemics in Mexico from 1655 to 1918, Study Shows

Epidemiological data integrated with climate data taken from tree-ring estimates of soil moisture levels demonstrate that drought contributed to the spread of typhus in Mexico from 1655 to 1918, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Arkansas.

The study has modern-day policy implications because although typhus can be treated with modern antibiotics, it remains a threat in remote, impoverished areas of South America, Asia and Africa and could reemerge as a serious infectious disease, especially where social strife and underdeveloped public health programs persist.

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17 February 2014

First World War: Around the War In a Handful of Objects

The First World War played a vital role in shaping the world we live in. One hundred years on, its events and its impact can be difficult to comprehend – but break it down into smaller narratives and it becomes more accessible.

The objects pictured here are mute witnesses from the conflict: each has a story of its creation and its subsequent use in the field. For many items associated with war, that tale is plain to see: machine guns intended to kill, gas masks to protect.

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4 February 2014

Why the Real World War One Heroine Who Was Inspiration Behind Downton Abbey Refused To Accept a CBE for Her Work Caring for the Wounded

The socialite who was the inspiration for Downton Abbey’s Lady Cora refused an honour recognising her work caring for the wounded during the First World War. Almina, the 5th Countess of Carnarvon, who trained as a nurse and turned Highclere Castle into a military hospital, apparently did not think she merited the CBE offered in the 1920 Honours List.

Her decision is recorded in Cabinet Office papers obtained by The Mail on Sunday. They reveal she was one of several female aristocrats who declined to be honoured.

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24 January 2014

France's Oldest Factory, Dating Back More Than 500 Years, To Close

What is believed to be the oldest factory in France, dating back to 1478, is set to close its doors. The Docelles paper mill employs 161 people, and while its Finland-based owner UPM is open to the sale of the mill’s machinery and property, the workers will lose their jobs.

Minister for industry, Arnaud Montebourg, has said he will look to help find a buyer, while the workers themselves have spoken of setting up a co-operative to protect some jobs.

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1918 Flu Pandemic That Killed 50 Million Originated in China, Historians Say

The global flu outbreak of 1918 killed 50 million people worldwide, ranking as one of the deadliest epidemics in history.

For decades, scientists have debated where in the world the pandemic started, variously pinpointing its origins in France, China, the American Midwest, and beyond. Without a clear location, scientists have lacked a complete picture of the conditions that bred the disease and factors that might lead to similar outbreaks in the future.

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