Build Your Family Tree, Share Your Family History and Improve Your Genealogy Research

New Geneanet website
New Geneanet website Logo

Sign In

Forgot username or password


Genealogy Blog

24 June 2014

Oldest Known Irish Manuscript To Be Exhibited Publicly

The oldest known surviving Irish manuscript will be among a number of works to be exhibited publicly for the first time in 2016, after Trinity College Dublin secured funding for a major conservation project.

The Codex Usserianius Primus, or First Book of Ussher, is an incomplete copy of the four Gospels on vellum, which may have been created as early as the 5th century, several centuries earlier than the Book of Kells.

Source & Full Story

Scotland: 15th Century Copy of Battle of Bannockburn Poem Restored

A copy of a poem revealing the details of the Battle of Bannockburn has been restored for the 700th anniversary of the battle. "The Brus" is believed to have been written by the Archdeacon of Aberdeen in 1375 and tells of Robert the Bruce's wars for Scottish independence.

The battle was fought on June 23 and 24 in 1314 and is relived through the 1,400-line poem. Now, a 15th century copy of the poem has been restored by a team at St John's College at Cambridge University.

Source & Full Story

13 June 2014

Pre-1989 Communist Documents To Be Transferred To National Archives of Hungary

The Institute of Political History (PTI) will have to transfer its archives stemming from the period 1944-1989 to the National Archives as the Kuria, Hungary’s supreme court, rejected the institute’s appeal on Wednesday, national dailies Nepszabadsag and Nepszava said on Thursday.

The archives concerned contain the documents of the Hungarian Socialist Workers’ Party and its predecessors, other left-wing political and social organisations as well as trade unions.

Source & Full Story

10 June 2014

Earliest Known Portrait of an African-American Slave Comes to US

A rare oil painting of an African slave from circa 1733 has been acquired by Virginia’s Jamestown-Yorktown Foundation, which runs the history museums at the Jamestown Settlement and Yorktown Victory Center. The portrait is one of a pair of paintings by William Hoare of Bath that shows the earliest known depictions of an African slave in the American colonies.

The portrait depicts Ayuba Suleiman Diallo, an educated African from a prominent family of Muslim clerics who was kidnapped on the Gambia River in 1731 and sold into slavery in colonial Maryland.

Source & Full Story

9 June 2014

Woman Receives WWI Love Letters 95 Years After They Were Written To Her Grandmother

An Oregon woman is now discovering the love that blossomed nearly a century ago between her grandmother and grandfather, all thanks to the kind determination of a total stranger.

It all started in 1918 when Nathan Byrd, serving in the military in France, wrote 25 letters to his wife Lota Byrd at home in Phoenix, Arizona. The story might have ended there, until a woman named Sheryl Caliguire found Nathan's letters to Lota in a Southern California car port 30 years ago, and held on to them all this time.

Source & Full Story

4 June 2014

Auction of Civil War Soldier's Skull Found at Gettysburg Canceled

An auction company late Monday canceled plans to sell the skull of a Civil War soldier and military items found near Gettysburg, Pa.

After facing mounting criticism, the Estate Auction Company, which had hoped the skull would sell for between $50,000 and $250,000, will instead hand over the skull to the Gettysburg National Military Park, auctioneer Thomas Taylor said. Katie Lawhon, spokeswoman for Gettysburg National Military Park, had described the proposed sale as "very unfortunate.”

Source & Full Story

16 May 2014

Norway To Open War Treason Archives

The head of the National Archives of Norway, Ivar Fonnes, announced this week that he’ll be opening up long-sealed files on the state’s court cases against tens of thousands of Norwegians who were accused of treason during World War II.

Only researchers and those directly affected by the charges filed and court cases held after the war have had access to the files. They include information on around 90,000 cases of alleged treason and more than 350 cases against Norwegians accused of war crimes.

Source & Full Story

Will the UK Government Ever Release These Secret Files to the Public?

On Tuesday, for the first time ever, the British Foreign & Commonwealth Office (FCO) welcomed a small group of reporters to the archives of Hanslope Park, a secretive, high-security compound in Buckinghamshire that it shares with intelligence agencies MI5 and MI6.

Some of the documents in question date back to the 17th century; others contain incriminating evidence of murder and torture by British colonial authorities – another NSA splash waiting to happen, if headline writers thought that 200-year-old stories would sell.

Source & Full Story

12 May 2014

Famed Sarajevo Library Reopens 22 Years After Destruction

Sarajevo's famed architectural jewel, "City Hall", or the National Library, reopened on Friday, 22 years after it was destroyed by Bosnian Serb forces' shelling during the 1992-1995 war.

"It is the symbol of our strength to overcome the past and our hope for a better future," Sarajevo's mayor Ivo Komsic said at the opening ceremony after the sounds of Beethoven's "Ode to Joy." In August 1992, Bosnian Serb gunners, who kept Sarajevo under a three-and-a-half-year long siege, targeted the library, built in 1896 in a pseudo-Moorish style, almost burning it to the ground.

Source & Full Story

9 May 2014

Melbourne, Australia: Victorian Archives Centre Open Doors to Hidden Records

Public Record Office Victoria's Jack Martin is pretty good at reading copperplate. Looking at the elaborate hand in which Edward 'Ned' Kelly's prison record is written, the need for such a skill becomes obvious.

"If you look at a page from a record, particularly 19th Century, reading can be slow," says Jack Martin. Although he's probably looked at Ned Kelly's record thousands of times, Jack is still excited by the detail, pointing out where someone has done a scrawled long subtraction in order to work out how old Kelly was when he died.

Source & Full Story

5 May 2014

A Glimpse Under a Mountain at the World’s Largest Photo Archive

Think that your cloud backup, off-site hard copies, and RAID setup will keep your photo collection safe? Well, probably. But some folks go to more extreme measures to preserve their archives.

Underground, a 16-minute documentary by the Carnegie Museum of Art, takes a look at the Bettman Archive, owned by Corbis Images. It’s a collection of more than 11 million photos, housed in a climate-controlled environment under a mountain in Pennsylvania.

Source & Full Story

2 May 2014

U.S. National Archives To Get Nazi Photo Album of Looted Art To Mark End of WWII in Europe

Another volume of Adolf Hitler’s notorious photo albums of looted Nazi art is set to be given to the National Archives on May 8 to mark the anniversary of the end of World War II in Europe, the Archives said Thursday.

The album, which contains photographs of looted paintings and other cultural items, is being donated to the Archives by the Monuments Men Foundation, an organization dedicated to the story of the lost art and the men who helped recover it.

Source & Full Story

28 April 2014

Wales' National Library Launches Plan One Year After Fire

The National Library of Wales' chief executive has set out new plans for the institution a year after a fire destroyed archives there. Aled Gruffydd Jones launched a three-year strategy twelve months after the fire caused £5m of damage to the library's roof.

Proposals include leading a debate on establishing a National Archive for Wales. It also aims to develop projects with the public sector. Mr Jones told staff the plan gave them a chance "not only to look back", but also an opportunity "to look forward".

Source & Full Story

22 April 2014

National Archives of Australia Battle To Preserve Nation's 'Birth Certificates'

Australians have the chance for a relatively rare glimpse of some of the most important documents in the country's history, with the nation's "birth certificates" on show at the National Archives.

Three of the seven precious documents that changed Australia's relationship with Britain are so fragile that their dark covers are taken off only for occasional viewing by the public, including the Easter and Anzac Day long weekends.

Source & Full Story

14 April 2014

Rosa Parks Archives Remain Unsold in Warehouse

At a time when interest in civil rights memorabilia is rekindled, a lifetime’s worth of Rosa Parks’ belongings — among them her Presidential Medal of Freedom — sits in a New York warehouse, unseen and unsold.

Parks’ archives could be worth millions, especially now that 50th anniversaries of the civil rights era are being celebrated and the hunt is on for artifacts to fill a new Smithsonian museum of African-American history. But a years-long legal fight between Parks’ heirs and her friends led to the memorabilia being taken away from her home city of Detroit and offered up to the highest bidder.

Source & Full Story

- page 2 of 29 -