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Genealogy Blog

22 October 2014

Sequoyah National Research Center Acquires Collection of Alaska Native Archives

The University of Arkansas at Little Rock’s Sequoyah National Research Center (SNRC) has acquired the Jeanie Greene Collection from television journalist Jeanie Greene of Anchorage, Alaska.

Throughout her career, Greene has conducted a wide variety of research projects on Alaska Native cultures and individuals within those cultures.

Source & Full Story

16 October 2014

National Archives of Malta, City Council of Girona Sign Agreement Over Photographic Archives

The National Archives of Malta, the Richard Ellis Archive (Malta) and the City Council of Girona- Centre de Recerca i Difusió de la Imatge (Centre for Image Research and Diffusion) have signed a memorandum of understanding. The aim is for them to work together in the preservation and promotion of their photographic archives.

“This is the beginning of a project through which we can reach the next stage in the development of our archives, this time in the photographaic sector,” National Archivist Charles Farrugia said.

Source & Full Story

15 October 2014

French Soldier’s Room Unchanged 96 Years After His Death in First World War

The name of dragoons officer Hubert Rochereau is commemorated on a war memorial in Bélâbre, his native village in central France, along with those of other young men who lost their lives in the first world war.

But Rochereau also has a much more poignant and exceptional memorial: his room in a large family house in the village has been preserved with his belongings for almost 100 years since his death in Belgium.

Source & Full Story

10 October 2014

Four Copies of Magna Carta To Be Shown Together for First Time

The four surviving copies of the original Magna Carta from 1215 will come together for the first time in history next February as part of a one-off event to mark the 800th anniversary of the signing of the historic document.

The Magna Carta – literally, Great Charter – was issued by King John in 1215, as his barons revolted and civil war loomed. It saw the monarch avert crisis by acknowledging that the king was not above the law, and with the granting of a range of rights to English citizens. “To no one will we sell, to no one deny or delay right or justice,” runs one of its most famous clauses.

Source & Full Story

6 October 2014

Help the National Library of France Acquire a National Treasure

The French National Library has launched a public appeal for the acquisition of a royal manuscript of King François I of France,Description des Douze Césars avec leurs figures (Tours, c. 1520).

This exceptional manuscript, classified as a national treasure, was illustrated by Jean Bourdichon for King François I of France. The manuscript, which is one of three original copies, is the most beautiful and will be the first to enter the French national collections.

Source & Full Story

Bosnia and Herzegovina Burnt State Archives Restored

Bosnia and Herzegovina's state archives hold “great importance” for Turkey, Turkish Cooperation and Coordination Agency Vice President Ali Maskan said Thursday.

He made the remarks at a ceremony held Thursday to reopen the state archives at the Bosnia and Herzegovina Presidency Building, which was set ablaze during an anti-government protest last February. The archives included documents from the Ottoman period.

Source & Full Story

30 September 2014

Iran State TV Accuses BBC of Document Theft from Government Archives

Iranian state television accused the BBC on Sunday of trying to steal “artistic, historic and cultural documents” from government archives in the Islamic Republic.

The BBC had no immediate comment on the claim, coming in a report on the Iranian broadcasting company’s website, though Iran has a history of accusing the British broadcaster as operating as a cover for spies and dissidents.

Source & Full Story

25 September 2014

Race To Stop Historic Hulton Family Archives Going Into Private Ownership

A group of historians are in a race against time to stop the records of an aristocratic family - who lived in Bolton for almost a millennium - from going into private ownership.

The Hulton Archive is being sold for £95,000 by family member who is not a direct descendant. When Sir Geoffrey Hulton died in the 1990s, he was the last in a line of Hultons which go back to 1167.

Source & Full Story

11 September 2014

Egypt: Project to Preserve National Archives Under Way

The National Archives of Egypt, founded in Cairo in 1828, is one of the oldest in the world.

It dates back to the 19th century when Mohamed Ali Pasha constructed a place in the Cairo Citadel (El-Qalaa) to preserve official records and named it Daftarkhana (House of Documentation).

Source & Full Story

5 September 2014

World War I: German Soldier Otto Strube's Photographs Captured Life Behind the Lines

When German photographer Otto Strube was called upon to fulfil his responsibilities of military service at the start of World War I, his camera went along with him. Now his family have shared his photographs, offering us a remarkable view of the German perspective of the war.

Otto served as a soldier in the German 44th Reserve Field Artillery Regiment and according to his grandson, ABC journalist Bernie Bowen, was involved in many of the battles Australians also fought on the Western Front.

Source & Full Story

21 July 2014

Holocaust Museum Acquires Copy of UN War Crimes Archive from WWII, Will Give Public Access

From Adolf Hitler down to the petty bureaucrats who staffed the Nazi death camps, thousands of perpetrators of World War II war crimes were eventually written up in vast reams of investigative files — files that now, for the first time, can be viewed in their entirety by the public.

The U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington has obtained a full copy of the U.N. War Crimes Commission archive that has largely been locked away for the past 70 years under restricted access at the United Nations. On Thursday, the museum will announce it has made the entire digital archive freely available to visitors in its research room.

Source & Full Story

3 July 2014

Soldier's Civil War Letters to Ohio Woman Compiled Into Book

Gerald Dougherty's relative found the letters, dozens of them, in the upstairs of an Ohio barn. They were yellowed with age, and some showed signs of nibbling by pests, but overall, they were in pretty good shape.

The letters, many written to Eve Ann (sometimes spelled Anne) Huffman, a 21-year-old woman from a small farming town in central Ohio, were from four young men — two of whom were her brothers — serving on the Union side during the Civil War.

Source & Full Story

30 June 2014

National Library of India Graveyard for Rare Books and Newspapers

National Library of India, which could have been a repository of priceless books and documents, has turned into a dumping ground. The roof of the new section -built at a cost of Rs 148 crore just nine years ago -has started leaking forcing employees to cover treasured books with tarpaulin.

Sources in the museum told TOI that rare books are being ripped apart, page by page, in the name of digital scanning and the original copies dumped like waste material.

Source & Full Story

27 June 2014

Historic Torrington, Connecticut, Photos Unearthed Ahead of Frederick Law Olmsted Documentary June 27

Research in advance of a screening of a PBS documentary on Frederick Law Olmsted has unearthed 250 photographs of the city in the early 1900s.

According to a release from the Torrington Historical Society, Edward Cannata, a volunteer at the Society, uncovered the photographs at a Massachusetts archive while researching Frederick Law Olmsted’s involvement with the city.

Source & Full Story

25 June 2014

South Wales Archives To Join Collection of Worldwide Historically Important Documents

Archives from South Wales are to sit alongside the Domesday Book and Winston Churchill's papers in a project which collects documents of historical importance from across the globe.

The Unesco Memory of the World programme is building a list of documents of specific historical or cultural significance and the UK register features the writings by Britain's wartime leader, as well as the death warrant signed by Parliament that cost Charles I his head.

Source & Full Story

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