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Genealogy Blog

30 September 2014

Iran State TV Accuses BBC of Document Theft from Government Archives

Iranian state television accused the BBC on Sunday of trying to steal “artistic, historic and cultural documents” from government archives in the Islamic Republic.

The BBC had no immediate comment on the claim, coming in a report on the Iranian broadcasting company’s website, though Iran has a history of accusing the British broadcaster as operating as a cover for spies and dissidents.

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25 September 2014

Race To Stop Historic Hulton Family Archives Going Into Private Ownership

A group of historians are in a race against time to stop the records of an aristocratic family - who lived in Bolton for almost a millennium - from going into private ownership.

The Hulton Archive is being sold for £95,000 by family member who is not a direct descendant. When Sir Geoffrey Hulton died in the 1990s, he was the last in a line of Hultons which go back to 1167.

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11 September 2014

Egypt: Project to Preserve National Archives Under Way

The National Archives of Egypt, founded in Cairo in 1828, is one of the oldest in the world.

It dates back to the 19th century when Mohamed Ali Pasha constructed a place in the Cairo Citadel (El-Qalaa) to preserve official records and named it Daftarkhana (House of Documentation).

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5 September 2014

World War I: German Soldier Otto Strube's Photographs Captured Life Behind the Lines

When German photographer Otto Strube was called upon to fulfil his responsibilities of military service at the start of World War I, his camera went along with him. Now his family have shared his photographs, offering us a remarkable view of the German perspective of the war.

Otto served as a soldier in the German 44th Reserve Field Artillery Regiment and according to his grandson, ABC journalist Bernie Bowen, was involved in many of the battles Australians also fought on the Western Front.

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21 July 2014

Holocaust Museum Acquires Copy of UN War Crimes Archive from WWII, Will Give Public Access

From Adolf Hitler down to the petty bureaucrats who staffed the Nazi death camps, thousands of perpetrators of World War II war crimes were eventually written up in vast reams of investigative files — files that now, for the first time, can be viewed in their entirety by the public.

The U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington has obtained a full copy of the U.N. War Crimes Commission archive that has largely been locked away for the past 70 years under restricted access at the United Nations. On Thursday, the museum will announce it has made the entire digital archive freely available to visitors in its research room.

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3 July 2014

Soldier's Civil War Letters to Ohio Woman Compiled Into Book

Gerald Dougherty's relative found the letters, dozens of them, in the upstairs of an Ohio barn. They were yellowed with age, and some showed signs of nibbling by pests, but overall, they were in pretty good shape.

The letters, many written to Eve Ann (sometimes spelled Anne) Huffman, a 21-year-old woman from a small farming town in central Ohio, were from four young men — two of whom were her brothers — serving on the Union side during the Civil War.

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30 June 2014

National Library of India Graveyard for Rare Books and Newspapers

National Library of India, which could have been a repository of priceless books and documents, has turned into a dumping ground. The roof of the new section -built at a cost of Rs 148 crore just nine years ago -has started leaking forcing employees to cover treasured books with tarpaulin.

Sources in the museum told TOI that rare books are being ripped apart, page by page, in the name of digital scanning and the original copies dumped like waste material.

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27 June 2014

Historic Torrington, Connecticut, Photos Unearthed Ahead of Frederick Law Olmsted Documentary June 27

Research in advance of a screening of a PBS documentary on Frederick Law Olmsted has unearthed 250 photographs of the city in the early 1900s.

According to a release from the Torrington Historical Society, Edward Cannata, a volunteer at the Society, uncovered the photographs at a Massachusetts archive while researching Frederick Law Olmsted’s involvement with the city.

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25 June 2014

South Wales Archives To Join Collection of Worldwide Historically Important Documents

Archives from South Wales are to sit alongside the Domesday Book and Winston Churchill's papers in a project which collects documents of historical importance from across the globe.

The Unesco Memory of the World programme is building a list of documents of specific historical or cultural significance and the UK register features the writings by Britain's wartime leader, as well as the death warrant signed by Parliament that cost Charles I his head.

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24 June 2014

Oldest Known Irish Manuscript To Be Exhibited Publicly

The oldest known surviving Irish manuscript will be among a number of works to be exhibited publicly for the first time in 2016, after Trinity College Dublin secured funding for a major conservation project.

The Codex Usserianius Primus, or First Book of Ussher, is an incomplete copy of the four Gospels on vellum, which may have been created as early as the 5th century, several centuries earlier than the Book of Kells.

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Scotland: 15th Century Copy of Battle of Bannockburn Poem Restored

A copy of a poem revealing the details of the Battle of Bannockburn has been restored for the 700th anniversary of the battle. "The Brus" is believed to have been written by the Archdeacon of Aberdeen in 1375 and tells of Robert the Bruce's wars for Scottish independence.

The battle was fought on June 23 and 24 in 1314 and is relived through the 1,400-line poem. Now, a 15th century copy of the poem has been restored by a team at St John's College at Cambridge University.

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13 June 2014

Pre-1989 Communist Documents To Be Transferred To National Archives of Hungary

The Institute of Political History (PTI) will have to transfer its archives stemming from the period 1944-1989 to the National Archives as the Kuria, Hungary’s supreme court, rejected the institute’s appeal on Wednesday, national dailies Nepszabadsag and Nepszava said on Thursday.

The archives concerned contain the documents of the Hungarian Socialist Workers’ Party and its predecessors, other left-wing political and social organisations as well as trade unions.

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10 June 2014

Earliest Known Portrait of an African-American Slave Comes to US

A rare oil painting of an African slave from circa 1733 has been acquired by Virginia’s Jamestown-Yorktown Foundation, which runs the history museums at the Jamestown Settlement and Yorktown Victory Center. The portrait is one of a pair of paintings by William Hoare of Bath that shows the earliest known depictions of an African slave in the American colonies.

The portrait depicts Ayuba Suleiman Diallo, an educated African from a prominent family of Muslim clerics who was kidnapped on the Gambia River in 1731 and sold into slavery in colonial Maryland.

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9 June 2014

Woman Receives WWI Love Letters 95 Years After They Were Written To Her Grandmother

An Oregon woman is now discovering the love that blossomed nearly a century ago between her grandmother and grandfather, all thanks to the kind determination of a total stranger.

It all started in 1918 when Nathan Byrd, serving in the military in France, wrote 25 letters to his wife Lota Byrd at home in Phoenix, Arizona. The story might have ended there, until a woman named Sheryl Caliguire found Nathan's letters to Lota in a Southern California car port 30 years ago, and held on to them all this time.

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4 June 2014

Auction of Civil War Soldier's Skull Found at Gettysburg Canceled

An auction company late Monday canceled plans to sell the skull of a Civil War soldier and military items found near Gettysburg, Pa.

After facing mounting criticism, the Estate Auction Company, which had hoped the skull would sell for between $50,000 and $250,000, will instead hand over the skull to the Gettysburg National Military Park, auctioneer Thomas Taylor said. Katie Lawhon, spokeswoman for Gettysburg National Military Park, had described the proposed sale as "very unfortunate.”

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