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Genealogy Blog

27 May 2014

Remains of 40 Confederate Soldiers Discovered in Virginia Cemetery

Their remains sat, unmarked, in shallow graves at the Old City Cemetery in Lynchburg, Va., for decades. Now, two centuries after the Civil War, the bodies of 40 Confederate soldiers discovered over the past two months will receive a proper memorial.

"It's been very meaningful to us to find these spots, identify these soldiers and bring closure to families," said Ted Delaney, the cemetery's assistant director, who, along with a team of archaeologists, uncovered the exact resting place of some 40 Confederate soldiers as well as the plots where Union soldiers were once buried and later exhumed.

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'Magical' 18th-Century Artifacts Found in Caribbean

Archaeologists working on two small Caribbean islands have found artifacts intentionally buried beneath two 18th-century plantation houses.

They appear to have been placed there for their spiritual power, protecting the inhabitants against harm, said John Chenoweth, a professor at the University of Michigan-Dearborn. The discoveries were made recently in the British Virgin Islands, an overseas territory of the United Kingdom.

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Found: Lost Photos of WWI Soldier Who Fought in the Trenches Alongside Siegfried Sassoon and Robert Graves and Inspired Their Poems

Long-lost photos of a soldier who inspired First World War poets Siegfried Sassoon and Robert Graves have been uncovered by his former school.

Pictured for the first time as a carefree school sportsman, David Cuthbert Thomas inspired Sassoon's A Subaltern - written in the trenches of the Somme just a week before Thomas was killed by a sniper. His poet friends described him as 'a gentle soldier, perfect and without stain' as they wept at his funeral, which was interrupted by the crashing of German weaponry.

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16 May 2014

Skeleton Reveals Secrets of New World's First People

A superbly preserved skeleton found in an underwater Mexican cave is that of a teenage girl that lived around 13,000 years ago, a genetic analysis of her remains has revealed.

The study of DNA extracted from the girl's wisdom tooth sheds light on a longstanding debate about the origins of the Western Hemisphere's first people and their relationship to today's Native American populations.

Source & Full Story

15 May 2014

Heartbreaking Letters From WWI Soldier To His Fiancee Just Months Before He Died on the Somme

A series of love letters sent from one of the first soldiers to die during the Battle of the Somme to his fiancee have been found in a dusty attic.

Private Frederick Bertram Key served with the 1/8th Battalion of the Royal Warwickshire Regiment as part of the ‘pals battalions’ between 1914 to 1916. He was killed at the age of 27 while fighting the German Empire during the bloody battle of the Somme, in France on July 1st, 1916 - the day the conflict began.

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14 May 2014

Letters Found in Maine Bring Bloody Civil War Battle Alive

One-hundred-fifty years ago this week, soldiers from Maine were among those taking part in one of the bloodiest clashes of the Civil War: the battle of Spotsylvania Court House.

For one Vermont resident, it's an historical event bought to life by a recently-discovered cache of letters written by her great-great-grandfather who was there - and captured an enemy flag before being wounded. Tom Porter has more.

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Christopher Columbus's Santa Maria Wreck 'Found'

A US underwater investigator has said he believes he has found the wreck of the Santa Maria, the flagship of Christopher Columbus's famed expedition. Barry Clifford said evidence "strongly suggests" a ruin off Haiti's north coast is the Santa Maria.

Mr Clifford's team has measured and taken photos of the wreck. He says he is working with the Haitian government to protect the site for a more detailed investigation.

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13 May 2014

1850s Cell Block Unearthed at Historic Australian Prison

Archaeologists say remains of a rare, circular 1850s prison block unearthed at the former Pentridge Prison is of world significance in penal history. The public will next month be able to view the extraordinary bluestone foundations of the panopticon, shaped like a Trivial Pursuit token, which experts say is one of the few examples of its type to survive.

It was part of a brutal 19th-century movement to keep prisoners in solitary contemplation, under total surveillance. Pentridge had three: this one, next to A Division on the north of the site is the first to be unearthed.

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6 May 2014

Mysterious 150-Year-Old Writing in Rare Copy of Homer's 'Odyssey' Identified

The case of the mystery marginalia began when the University received a donation of Homer's works from collector M.C. Lang in 2007.

The collection included a 1504 Venetian edition of the Odyssey containing handwritten annotations in an unknown script. The annotations were thought to date back to the mid-19th century, but nothing else was known about them.

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5 May 2014

Britain’s Oldest Settlement Is Amesbury Not Thatcham, Say Scientists

Britain’s oldest settlement is not where we thought it was, a team of archaeologists said on Thursday as they announced with confidence that Amesbury should now hold the distinction.

It was previously considered that Thatcham in Berkshire held the distinction but researchers from the University of Buckingham are certain we need to look 40 miles west, to the parish of Amesbury, in Wiltshire, which also includes Stonehenge.

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30 April 2014

Lost Medieval Village Discovered in Scottish Borderlands

An archaeological team working in southern Scotland have uncovered the remains of a village that existed between the 14th and 16th centuries.

The discoveries were made during a Scottish Water project to lay a new water main on the outskirts of Selkirk. The archaeologists uncovered the foundations of stone built structures, cobbled farmyards and the foundations of walls, buildings and hearths.

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29 April 2014

Rare Medal Sale Reveals Story of Soldier Who Became Professional Footballer After Standing on Bomb To Save Comrades

The astonishing story of how a soldier stood on a bomb to save his comrades and recovered enough to go on to play professional football has emerged after his medals were sold.

Lance Corporal James Collins was advised to have his lower right leg amputated after being seriously injured in the blast in the trenches on the Western Front. But the talented footballer refused to allow medics to remove the limb and instead underwent 14 operations over the next two years to save his foot.

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25 April 2014

SS City of Chester, Sunken 1888 Shipwreck, Found Near Golden Gate Bridge

A steamship that sank with 16 passengers aboard in 1888 has been located again under the Golden Gate Bridge, leading to the release of new sonar images of the boat sitting upright, covered in mud.

James Delgado, director of maritime heritage for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Marine Sanctuaries, called the rediscovery of the passenger ship the "City of Chester," which was first located more than 100 years ago, quite remarkable. And not just because it was the Bay Area’s second most deadly shipwreck.

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15 Veteran Cemetery Markers Found Roadside in Zanesville, Ohio

When Bobby Kimes was picking up empty soda cans with his daughter Elizabeth last Friday, he never expected to find what he did. Thrown on the side of Crock Road were 15 bronze cemetery markers, the kind used to mark the graves of armed forces veterans.

Kimes then examined the medallions, noticing some were decorated with World War I, Gulf War and Vietnam War inscriptions. Others had their inscriptions ground off, he said, but most remained in good condition.

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24 April 2014

Woman Finds Love Letter 6 Decades Old and Tracks Down Soldier Who Wrote It

A couple of years ago, Sandi Blood of Murrells Inlet, S.C., purchased a pile of paperbacks at a used bookstore in the next town. When she opened one of her “fictional beach reads,” she said a letter slipped out. For years, it had been lost inside the pages.

The yellowed envelope was dated November 1951. It was one of those red, white and blue air-mailed envelopes, she said, with an Army/Air Force Postal Service postmark and a 6-cent stamp still stuck to the corner. And it was sent from a "G. LeBlanc."

Source & Full Story

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