Build Your Family Tree, Share Your Family History and Improve Your Genealogy Research

Geneanet

Sign In

Forgot username or password


Genealogy Blog

27 August 2014

Royal Canadian Geographical Society's New Hunt On for Lost Franklin Ships

The Royal Canadian Geographical Society is using new technologies to hunt for old shipwrecks: Erebus and Terror, the missing ships of Sir John Franklin’s doomed Arctic expedition.

The two British warships were trapped in ice in 1848, and all 129 men in the expedition died. Now wreck hunters will focus on Victoria Strait, a different area from the places where many previous expeditions have searched.

Source & Full Story

26 August 2014

Black Death Mass Grave Found in Barcelona, Spain

The Basilica of Sant Just i Pastor, in the heart of Barcelona’s historic Gothic Quarter, has been a place of Christian worship since the fourth century.

In recent years it has provided archeologists with rich bounty: Roman remains from the first century, when the colony of Barcino was founded by the emperor Augustus, along with a Visigothic baptismal font, and the chancel from a sixth-century basilica. The latest find is around 120 bodies packed like sardines in a mass grave under the sacristy that could provide new insight into the impact of the Black Death, which devastated Europe in the mid-14th century.

Source & Full Story

25 August 2014

WWI Scottish Regiment Soldier 'May Have Been First Australian-Born Casualty'

New details have emerged indicating Lieutenant Leslie Richmond, born in Victoria, died at the Battle of Mons on August 23, 1914 while serving with the 1st Gordon Highlanders.

Just weeks ago, the Australian War Memorial altered their records to recognise Lieutenant Malcolm Chisholm as the first Australian-born casualty after he was killed in France on August 27. For many years, Seaman William "Billy" Williams and Captain Brian Pockley were honoured as the first Australians to fall after their deaths on September 11, 1914 in the battle of Bita Paka in Papua New Guinea.

Source & Full Story

1 August 2014

Scientists: Ship Found Buried at New York's World Trade Center Predates American Revolution

Researchers say a ship unearthed at the site of New York's World Trade Center predates American independence.

Columbia University scientists say they've determined wood used in the ship's frame came from a Philadelphia-area forest in 1773 — three years before the signing of the Declaration of Independence and start of the Revolutionary War.

Source & Full Story

28 July 2014

Mystery Poem Found in World War One Kilt

A hidden poem from a Glasgow woman has been found sewn into the folds of a World War One kilt owned by a Southampton academic. Dr Helen Paul discovered the hand-written message when she was removing the packing stitches from the kilt, which has been passed down her family.

The note is a poem with lines including: "If married never mind, if single drop a line". It is signed by Helen Govan, of 49 Ardgowan Street in Glasgow.

Source & Full Story

24 July 2014

400-Year-Old Crucifix Found by Canadian Student

It is tiny in size — measuring only 1.1 inches in width — and its top is broken, but a 400- year-old copper crucifix found at Newfoundland's Avalon Peninsula earlier in July has big historical significance, according to historians. It symbolizes an early dream of religious freedom in North America.

The artifact is clearly a Catholic item, featuring a simple representation of Christ on the front and the Virgin Mary and Christ Child on the back. Yet it was found in a predominantly English settlement.

Source & Full Story

18 July 2014

British Student Discovers Iconic World War II Bunker Buried More than 70 Years

A World War II air raid shelter buried for more than 70 years has been discovered at a primary school by a pupil — and it was so well-preserved the light bulb still works. The iconic Anderson shelter was unearthed at Stoke Community Primary School, in Medway, Kent.

Youngster Harvey Cotton, 10, had been taking part in a school activity when he saw a block of concrete at the back of what used to be an orchard in the school grounds. School caretaker Chris Poulter was sent to investigate and was amazed at what he found.

Source & Full Story

9 July 2014

Mystery of Irishman Who Was WWII Hero Solved After 62 Years

The 62-year mystery of an Irishman whose investigations during World War II helped return millions in stolen art and diamonds has finally been solved.

Eugene Smith, who was born in Lavey, Co Cavan, in 1913 but emigrated to the US as a child, disappeared after his military plane crashed into a glacier in Alaska in 1952. For decades his family, both in America and in Cavan, suspected he had died in the crash, but were never able to recover his body or give Eugene a proper burial.

Source & Full Story

8 July 2014

Rare World War II Map Found in Deceased Veteran's Garage

Fifty-two World War II stories that were hidden in a Rehoboth Beach garage will finally be told. In just a few weeks, a World War II museum in Delaware will welcome a new, historic artifact – an enormous map documenting a rear admiral's travels, as well as every U.S. submarine lost in the war.

"I think it’s safe to say that there is no other map like this in the country," Dr. Gary Wray, president of the Fort Miles Historical Association, said.

Source & Full Story

7 July 2014

Amelia Earhart's Disappearance: The Answer in Photos?

New forensic imaging techniques might solve the longstanding mystery over the fate of Amelia Earhart, whose plane vanished over the Pacific Ocean on July 2, 1937, in a record attempt to fly around the world at the equator.

At the center of sophisticated imaging techniques are a handful of 1937 pictures of Earhart’s twin-engined Lockheed "Electra." Those were taken in Miami -- the fourth stop on the aviator’s attempt to circumnavigate the globe -- and show a distinctive patch of metal installed to replace a navigational window.

Source & Full Story

25 June 2014

Spanish Documents Suggest Irish Arrived in America Before Columbus

While Christopher Columbus is generally credited with having discovered America in 1492, a 1521 Spanish report provides inklings of evidence that there were, in fact, Irish people settled in America prior to Columbus’ journey.

“Researchers feel certain that there was a colony of Irish folk living in what is now South Carolina, when Christopher Columbus “thought” he had discovered the New World,” writes Richard Thornton for The Examiner.

Source & Full Story

20 June 2014

Dracula's Tomb Found in Italy? Er...Not Really

Has the tomb of Vlad III the Impaler, the historical Dracula, been found in the center of Naples in Italy? Not really. Experts and bloggers are now debunking the claim that circulated late last week, saying it’s not rooted in real history but rather resembles a Da Vinci Code conspiracy novel.

According to a report in the Italian daily Il Mattino, the remains of the 15th century Romanian prince upon which Bram Stoker's gothic novel "Dracula" is based, lie in a cloister in the Santa Maria La Nova church in Naples.

Source & Full Story

10 June 2014

'Incredibly Important' Medieval Find in Wales

Archaeologists says they have discovered an "incredibly important" medieval convent, cemetery and Tudor mansion in Ceredigion. The location of Llanllyr nunnery in the Aeron Valley had been a mystery until now.

The convent, founded by Lord Rhys ap Gruffudd in 1180, was a daughter house of the Strata Florida abbey, a former Cistercian monastery which was of immense importance to Wales during the Middle Ages.

Source & Full Story

9 June 2014

10th-Century Viking king May Have Been Discovered in Scotland

In 2005 archaeologists working in eastern Scotland came across the skeleton of a warrior buried in a saint’s cemetery. A historian now believes these might be the remains of Olaf Guthfrithsson, King of Dublin and Northumbria from 934 to 941.

The remains were uncovered in the village of Auldhame, East Lothian, which is home to an Anglo-Saxon church and cemetery.

Source & Full Story

5 June 2014

Oldest Known Pair of Pants Unearthed

The world’s first-known pants were recently excavated from tombs in western China, reports a new study.

The pants, which date from 3,000 to 3,300 years ago, are tattered, but are surprisingly stylish, combining attractive form with function. Made out of wool, the trousers feature straight-fitting legs and a wide crotch. The pants were discovered in an excavation led by archaeologists Ulrike Beck and Mayke Wagner of the German Archaeological Institute in Berlin.

Source & Full Story

- page 1 of 33