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Genealogy Blog

30 September 2014

New YIVO Project Digitizes, Reunites Ransacked Pre-War Archive

The YIVO Institute for Jewish Research announced Sept. 23 the launch of the Vilna Project, a seven-year international project digitize YIVO’s pre-war archives online.

Though ransacked by the Nazis in 1941, the YIVO archives still possess the largest collection of materials on the thousand-year history of Jewish life in Eastern Europe and Russia. The collections tell us how Jews lived, where they came from, how they raised and educated their families, how they created art, literature, music and language itself.

Source & Full Story

Iran State TV Accuses BBC of Document Theft from Government Archives

Iranian state television accused the BBC on Sunday of trying to steal “artistic, historic and cultural documents” from government archives in the Islamic Republic.

The BBC had no immediate comment on the claim, coming in a report on the Iranian broadcasting company’s website, though Iran has a history of accusing the British broadcaster as operating as a cover for spies and dissidents.

Source & Full Story

29 September 2014

Group Asking for Public's Help To Identify Mystery Marker Found in Historic Wagoner, Oklahoma, Cemetery

The Three Forks Genealogy Society unearthed a mystery at a historic cemetery in Wagoner. Members started an investigation at Elmwood Cemetery a few weeks ago after someone sent them a picture of what appeared to be a small tombstone.

Digging a few inches into the dirt revealed the names of a church, its trustees and a pastor. At the top of the marker, it read, "The Year of Our Lord 1919, Bethel Hill A.M.E. Church." It then listed the pastor as William J. Stanley and the church trustees as A.J. Foster, A.L. Rollins, R.A. Montague, J.L. Rollins, and J.H. Montague.

Source & Full Story

WWI Canadian Soldiers' Remains Identified

Nearly a century after they died in battle, the remains of unidentified Canadian soldiers who fought in the First World War are still being found in Europe. Today the Department of National Defence released the names of four who died during the Battle of Amiens in August 1918.

Their resting place was discovered in 2006 by then 14-year-old Fabien Demeusere, while digging in his back garden in Hallu, France, 120 kilometres north of Paris.

Source & Full Story

New: Take Pictures of Cemeteries with GeneaGraves, the New Geneanet Mobile App for Android

Cemeteries are one of the most important resources for genealogists, and we must capture cemetery headstones before they are lost. Join the GeneaGraves project!

Upload your pictures to Geneanet with a wifi access point. Then, index the name of the persons listed on the gravestones with the help of other Geneanet members.

Download the GeneaGraves app and photograph gravestones from a cemetery. It's free and easy!



GeneaGraves will come out soon for iOS.

27 September 2014

Are You Related to Avril Lavigne?

Avril Ramona Lavigne was born on September 27, 1984 in Belleville, Ontario. Her father, Jean-Claude Joseph Lavigne, named her "Avril" after the French word for the month of April.

At the age of two, she began singing church songs with her mother, Judith-Rosanne "Judy" (née Loshaw). Judy recognized her two-year-old daughter's talents after hearing her sing "Jesus Loves Me" in church. Lavigne has an older brother, Matthew, and a younger sister, Michelle, both of whom teased her when she sang. "My brother used to knock on the wall because I used to sing myself to sleep and he thought it was really annoying." Her father is of French descent and her mother has English, Scottish, and German ancestry.

Avril Lavigne's Family Tree

26 September 2014

National Archives of the United Arab Emirates To Open Corner in Kidzania Dubai

The National Archives of the United Arab Emirates signed with the children’s world city of education and entertainment ‘KidZania Dubai’ an agreement to allocate a corner to the National Archives in KidZania.

This corner will open at the end of this year, thus the National Archives of the UAE’s will be the first archives in the world to have a branch in KidZania.

Source & Full Story

National Archives of India Invites Applications for 86 Posts

The National Archives of India, New Delhi has invited applications for recruitment from eligible and interested candidates for various Supervisors, Archival Assistant, Mender and other posts.

The National Archives of India is the repository of the non-current records of the government of India and is holding them in trust for the use of administrators and scholars.

Source & Full Story

National Library of Australia Invests in Digital Future

Under an innovative digital library program, the National Library of Australia (NLA) is redeveloping infrastructure to manage its huge digital collections and provide access to collections from hundreds of libraries across its network.

The library is expanding its online and mobile services for Australian and international users. More than 70,000 people use its Trove service each day and 22 million users were clocked up last year.

Source & Full Story

25 September 2014

Genealogy Software Updates of the Week

Brother's Keeper 7.0.31 (Full Featured - Windows - Purchase)

• Fixed a problem when adding new people on Edit if the option was turned on to ignore accents when searching for names.
• Fixed a problem when deleting or moving General ToDo list items.

Families (Legacy Family Tree) for iPhone and iPad 2.1.3 (Mobile - Purchase)

• Fix bug adding source to marriage event.
• Fix bug deleting marriage event.

Genealone 1.3.3 (Web Publishing - Windows, Mac, Linux - Purchase)

• Important bug in person editing has been fixed.
• Several minor improvements.

MobileFamilyTree for iPhone and iPad 7.2.5 (Mobile - Purchase)

• Optimized for iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus.

My Family Tree 4.0.0.0 (Full Featured - Windows - Freeware)

• Startup performance improvement.
• Added Spanish translation.
• Minor UI improvements.
• Added support for the GEDCOM submission record.
• Added support for GEDCOM submitter records.
• Fixed issue with display of text only dates in family chart.

myGenealogy for iPad 1.8 (Mobile - Freeware)

• iOS 8 Ready.

RootsMagic 6.3.3.0 (Full Featured - Windows - Purchase)

• New: Direct TMG (The Master Genealogist) import.
• Fixed: TMG Import: Better handling of individual vs family events.
• Fixed: TMG Import: Repositories link properly to sources.
• Fixed: TMG Import: Latitude/Longitude are imported.
• Fixed: TMG Import: Surety for citations imported.
• Fixed: TMG Import: Primary event checkbox preseved on import.
• Fixed: TMG Import: Birth year on side index now appears.

Help Support Digitizing Project for 106-Year-Old Sanford Herald

Through a fortunate gathering of partners, the historic issues of the Sanford Herald will soon be available online with word-searching capabilities similar to Google. Imagine being able to access a website for free and to search for your great aunt’s obituary or your cousin’s high school football win, all from your home computer!

When this project is completed, researchers, historians, students and the average reader can easily search for historic information that has been preserved in this most American of institutions, the local newspaper.

Source & Full Story

Race To Stop Historic Hulton Family Archives Going Into Private Ownership

A group of historians are in a race against time to stop the records of an aristocratic family - who lived in Bolton for almost a millennium - from going into private ownership.

The Hulton Archive is being sold for £95,000 by family member who is not a direct descendant. When Sir Geoffrey Hulton died in the 1990s, he was the last in a line of Hultons which go back to 1167.

Source & Full Story

24 September 2014

The British Library’s Endangered Archives Programme: Call for Applications

The Endangered Archives Programme at the British Library is now accepting grant applications for the next round of funding.

Detailed information on the timetable, criteria, eligibility and application procedures is available on the Programme’s website. Applications will be accepted in English or in French. The deadline for receipt of preliminary grant applications is 7 November 2014.

Source & Full Story

23 September 2014

An American Sculptor’s Masks Restored French Soldiers Disfigured in World War I

On the day after Christmas in 1920, a French mailman and veteran of World War I wrote an American woman named Anna Coleman Ladd to thank her for what she had done for him during the war.

Ladd knew the veteran, Charles Victor, who had been wounded in the face by a hand grenade in 1915. She had two photos of him. In one, he is sitting in a chair, wearing his uniform and military medals. He has large ears and a shock of dark hair, parted on the side. But the lower half of his face is mutilated. Most of his nose and lips are gone, and his mouth looks crooked and rearranged.

Source & Full Story

22 September 2014

Monument to First Lady Michelle Obama’s Ancestor Melvinia Shields Dedicated in Kingston, Georgia

Melvinia Shields, the great-great-great-grandmother of First Lady Michelle Obama, helped deliver William Hill.

Now 86, Hill still remembers the woman who brought him into this world, and who for decades was buried in an unmarked grave behind Queen Chapel Methodist Church in Kingston. Hill joined some 150 others Saturday morning at the Kingston church for the dedication of a monument to Shields. Born a slave in 1844 and later emancipated, Shields moved to Kingston and stayed some 50 years.

Source & Full Story

New: Edit Your Geneanet Family Tree on Your Mobile and Your Tablet

Geneanet offers to edit your family tree on your mobile and your tablet.

This app is designed to view your GeneaNet family tree wherever you go so your can show your data and pictures to your family and friends.

Now, you can also edit your family tree on your mobile and your tablet.

Continue reading...

Are You Related to Debby Boone?

Debby Boone was born on September 22, 1956 in Hackensack, New Jersey, the third of four daughters born to singer-actor Pat Boone and Shirley Foley Boone, daughter of country music star Red Foley.

When Boone was 14 years old, she began touring with her parents and three sisters: Cherry, Lindy and Laury. The sisters first recorded with their parents as The Pat Boone Family and later as the Boones or Boone Girls. They primarily recorded gospel music, although the sisters also released singles for the Motown and Curb labels that were remakes of secular pop music featuring Debby as the lead vocalist.

Debby Boone's Family Tree

19 September 2014

Pictures of the Mazargues War Cemetery, Marseilles, France, Now Available on Geneanet

Mazargues is a suburb of Marseilles, France, six kilometres from the centre of the city.

Marseilles was the Base of the Indian troops in France during the First World War, and throughout the War the Royal Navy, the Merchant Navy, British troops and Labour units worked in the port or passed through it. Four of the town cemeteries were used, in the main, for the burial of officers and men of the Commonwealth forces who died at Marseilles.

Mazargues Cemetery, on the South-East side, was used less in the War but before the Armistice an extension was made, to which were later removed the bodies or ashes from the four town cemeteries and from Port St. Louis-du-Rhone Communal Cemetery.

Click here to access this new collection (1,334 pictures).

If you want to join the Collaborative Indexing Project, please click the 'Click here to add some Listed Persons' link below any picture of tombstone.

'Lost Chapel' Skeletons Found Holding Hands After 700 Years

University of Leicester archaeologists have uncovered a trove of relics and remains at Chapel of St Morrell in Leicestershire.

Some relationships last a lifetime -- and University of Leicester archaeologists have discovered that they can last even longer after unearthing two skeletons at a lost chapel in Leicestershire that have been holding hands for 700 years.

Source & Full Story

Archives Compilation of Chinese Laborers Forced to Japan Issued

A staff member places original archives of Chinese laborers forced to Japan on a table during a seminar on issuing the archives compilation at the Museum of the War of the Chinese People's Resistance Against Japanese Aggression, in Beijing, China, Sept. 18, 2014.

From 1943 to 1945, some 40,000 Chinese were captured and taken by the invaders to Japan, forcing them to work in mines and construction sites. A total of 6,830 died due to the ruthless exploitation, according to the data from Japan.

Source & Full Story

18 September 2014

Genealogy Software Updates of the Week

GEDitCOM II 2.0 (Full Featured - Mac - Purchase)

• Tested in 10.6 (now required) through Mavericks (10.9).
• Scripts and User Interfaces Formats are all redone as Extensions and Browser Styles.
• The "Restore Resources" feature has a new option to do a clean update, which replaces the entire GEDitCOM II "System" folder with a clean copy.
• Family tree charts are now fully dynamic and have added numerous options to directly edit your data in the tree.
• The "Default Format" now shows portraits of individuals and families in the main pane of the browser window.
• Family tree charts now indicate unmarried couples with dotted lines instead of solid lines.
• There are now separate "Create Son" and "Daughter" buttons in the attach child dialog box.
• Many minor bug fixes and interface enhancements.
• And much more...

GedView for iPhone and iPad 3.4.3 (Mobile - Purchase)

• Bug fixes.

Genealone 1.3.2 (Web Publishing - Windows, Mac, Linux - Purchase)

• Several bugs have been fixed and the code has been optimized.
• WordPress plugin configuration has been improved.
• New feature: Command line GEDCOM importer in genealone/tools directory. The script is useful for importing really large GEDCOM files. You need to be able to run PHP script from command line to use it.

The Complete Genealogy Reporter 2014 build 140913 (Family Books - Windows - Shareware)

• Fixed: Inappropriate additional new line being included in Notes in some circumstances.
• Improved: The left margin indentations in some index lists have been reduced to improve consistency.
• Improved: In narrative sections, long child lists which split across two pages now waste less space.

Link Found in Genetic Connection Between Modern Europeans and Native Americans

It has long been believed that modern Europeans descended from indigenous hunters and Middle Eastern farmers. But a new study suggests all Europeans today have DNA from a third mystery group: Ancient North Eurasians.

This group appears to have contributed DNA to present-day Europeans, as well as to the people who travelled across the Bering Strait into the Americas more than 15,000 years ago.

Source & Full Story

17 September 2014

Forgotten Ghost Ships Off Golden Gate Revealed

A team of NOAA researchers today confirmed the discovery just outside San Francisco's Golden Gate strait of the 1910 shipwreck SS Selja and an unidentified early steam tugboat wreck tagged the "mystery wreck."

The researchers also located the 1863 wreck of the clipper ship Noonday, currently obscured by mud and silt on the ocean floor.

Source & Full Story

Civil War Soldiers Buried as 'Unknowns' ID'd in Marietta, Georgia

The names of 350 Confederate soldiers buried as “Unknowns” in the Confederate Cemetery here will now be forever emblazoned on memorial walls facing their graves as a result of the work of a local historian.

A bronze statue of a Confederate soldier will be erected there soon as well. Brown Park now has four granite walls commemorating 1,150 Confederate soldiers buried in the adjacent Marietta Confederate Cemetery after two new memorial walls were installed.

Source & Full Story

15 September 2014

China Reveals Archives of Victory Against Japan in WWII

China released archives of an important military victory in 1939, in which the Chinese army killed more than 4,000 Japanese soldiers.

This is the 19th part of the series released daily by the State Archives Administration from Aug. 25, as the country marks the 69th anniversary of victory against Japan's aggression.

Source & Full Story

500 Child Skeletons Found in Workhouse Mass Grave Tell of Struggles During the Irish Great Hunger

Skeletons of over 500 children who died during the Great Hunger were found seven years ago buried in a mass grave within what was once the Kilkenny Union Workhouse. With over three years of research on their bones, bio-archaeologists have been able to uncover the children's harrowing stories and medical secrets.

The new study, funded by the Irish Research Council, is based upon the "skeletal manifestation of stress in child victims of the Great Hunger."

Source & Full Story

Check the Missing Facts in Your Geneanet Family Tree

Looking for an easy way to view missing facts in your family tree? Geneanet has a solution!

On Geneanet, you can automatically display a table where all missing facts are shown to focus research on important goals.

Here is how to do it.

Continue reading...

12 September 2014

Black Death Skeletons Unearthed in Peterborough, England

Developers building houses in Peterborough have unearthed a fascinating glimpse of the city's past.

They've discovered a huge burial ground in Midland Road containing the skeletons of at least 70 people. It's thought the remains could be victims of the Black Death. For centuries they lay undisturbed while above them life went on for successive generations of Peterboreans.

Source & Full Story

In Search of the Spanish Armada Off the Irish Coast

The Invincible Armada had been navigating its way through the wilderness of the North Atlantic.

On the dawn of September 7, 1588, the Duke of Medina Sidonia, captain of the San Martín and the commanding officer of the vast fleet Philip II had created to invade England, scanned the horizon. Low on water and provisions, he now faced the task of returning to Spain with 112 badly damaged vessels carrying around 3,000 wounded by sailing round Scotland, and then the west coast of Ireland.

Source & Full Story

Are You Related to Paul Walker?

Walker was born on September 12, 1973 in Glendale, California, and was the son of Cheryl (née Crabtree), a fashion model, and Paul William Walker III, a sewer contractor and a fighter who was a two-time Golden Gloves champion.

His ancestry was mostly English, with a smaller amount of German. His paternal grandfather, a professional boxer, had English immigrant grandparents. One of his grandfathers raced factory cars for Ford in the 1960s. The oldest of five siblings, Walker was raised primarily in the Sunland community of Los Angeles and attended high school in the San Fernando Valley, graduating from Sun Valley's Village Christian School in 1991.

Paul Walker's Family Tree

11 September 2014

Genealogy Software Updates of the Week

Brother's Keeper 7.0.29 (Full Featured - Windows - Purchase)

• Sometimes when adding a new person, a 'stop statement' error would happen. Fixed.
• If the option is turned on to ignore accented characters in a name search, it also works for Alternate Names also if that type of search is turned on. Fixed.

Family Get-To-Gether 1.2.3 (Mobile - Purchase)

• New options for ‘Calendar’ and daily events reminders.
• More ‘Events’ (Engagement, Marriage) and new ‘Filter’, and ’Sort’ options added for ‘Calendar’ page.
• New member’s information fields added: Phone, E-Mail.
• Miscellaneous quality enhancements.

Genealone for WordPress (Web Publishing - Windows, Mac, Linux - Purchase) NEW!

• Genealone WP is a plugin for WordPress which runs entire Genealone as a part of WordPress site or blog. Plugin has the same functions as standalone Genealone program including GEDCOM file import.

MacBridge for RootsMagic 6 (Other Tools - Mac - Purchase) NEW!

• MacBridge for RootsMagic 6 allows you easily install and run RootsMagic on your Mac in mere minutes with almost no additional setup or configuration. MacBridge for RootsMagic is different than other solutions you may be familiar with. For starters, it does not install Windows on your Mac. It also does not create a slow and bulky virtual computer. It runs right on your Mac, using your Mac file system.

Egypt: Project to Preserve National Archives Under Way

The National Archives of Egypt, founded in Cairo in 1828, is one of the oldest in the world.

It dates back to the 19th century when Mohamed Ali Pasha constructed a place in the Cairo Citadel (El-Qalaa) to preserve official records and named it Daftarkhana (House of Documentation).

Source & Full Story

9 September 2014

Toronto’s First Casualty of World War I

In a war rife with brutality, it is unreasonable to categorize one soldier’s demise as more harrowing than another’s, or his grace in dying as more admirable than that of those who fell around him.

So the horrible circumstances surrounding the death of Bertram Denison, Toronto’s first casualty of the First World War, and the kindness he demonstrated in his final days, didn’t exceed those of his fellow servicemen. They exemplified them.

Source & Full Story

8 September 2014

7 Unusual Cemeteries in New York City

Cemeteries are not just for the grieving or the morbid. They are often bucolic places secreted away amid the noise of the city. They can even offer settings for reflection and rest, and some attract tourists seeking the tombstones of the departed famous.

There are dozens of cemeteries in the five boroughs, from the majestic to the humble. Here are seven that are among the most unusual.

Source & Full Story

How To Trace the Places Where Your Ancestors Lived in Your Geneanet Family Tree?

Most of archival records - especially censuses - say where your ancestors resided in.

Tracing where your ancestors lived is very interesting and it might help you to overcome a brick wall.

In your Geneanet family tree, you can add as many facts as you need, including the residence names.

Here is how to do it.

Continue reading...

6 September 2014

Are You Related to Roger Waters?

George Roger Waters was born on 6 September 1943, the younger of two boys, to Mary (née Whyte; 1913-2009) and Eric Fletcher Waters (1913-1944), in Great Bookham, Surrey.

His father, the son of a coal miner and Labour Party activist, was a schoolteacher, a devout Christian, and a Communist Party member. In the early years of the Second World War, his father was a conscientious objector who drove an ambulance during the Blitz. He later changed his stance on pacifism and joined the British Army, and as a 2Lt. of the 8th Royal Fusiliers died at Aprilia, between Anzio and Rome in Italy, on 18 February 1944, when Roger was five months old.

Roger Waters' Family Tree

5 September 2014

World War I: German Soldier Otto Strube's Photographs Captured Life Behind the Lines

When German photographer Otto Strube was called upon to fulfil his responsibilities of military service at the start of World War I, his camera went along with him. Now his family have shared his photographs, offering us a remarkable view of the German perspective of the war.

Otto served as a soldier in the German 44th Reserve Field Artillery Regiment and according to his grandson, ABC journalist Bernie Bowen, was involved in many of the battles Australians also fought on the Western Front.

Source & Full Story

Fluke Discovery of World War I Officer’s Diary Under the Floorboards During a House Renovation

Ripping up floorboards in old houses usually yields nothing more historic than rot and rats. But the State Library of NSW is the richer for what Glen Butler found while renovating his Manly home.

It was a WWI diary penned by Sydney-born military officer Geoffrey Gaden while fighting the Germans in the trenches of France in 1916. The almost pristine diary was secreted under the floorboards of an upstairs bedroom and evidently forgotten before Mr Butler bought the house about three years ago.

Source & Full Story

4 September 2014

Genealogy Software Updates of the Week

Brother's Keeper 7.0.27 (Full Featured - Windows - Purchase)

• Fixed a problem in version 7.0.26 which could cause a problem with the search index if you changed the spelling of the name of an existing person.
• Faster search times when searching for a name in a large database.
• The two other Views from Edit will show Married (civil) and Married (religious) and not just the normal Married event.

Family Chronicle 4.9.59 (Mobile - Purchase)

• New iOS7 look and feel.
• New iPhone homepage and issue details.
• Restore purchases fix.

Genealone 1.3.1 (Web Publishing - Windows, Mac, Linux - Purchase)

• Several bugs have been fixed and the code has been optimized.
• Design has been slightly improved.
• Links for creating missing father and/or mother are displayed to editors and administrators on person’s pages.
• Persons, places and sources merging have been improved.

Pocket Genealogist 4.09A03 Public Beta (Mobile - Purchase)

• Recognition of TMG v9.

The Family Tree of Family for Android 1.9.6 (Mobile - Purchase)

• Updated genealogical map.

A New Project from Yale Invites Viewers To Explore Some 175,000 Images of America in the 1930s and '40s

For a singular image of the Great Depression and the roughness of those years, it's hard to do much better than Dorothea Lange's 1936 photograph of Florence Owens Thompson, two of her children tucking their faces over her shoulders, a baby in her lap.

Where that image comes from, there are many, many more: around 175,000 surviving portraits of America between 1935 and 1945 taken by the photographers of the government's Farm Security Administration. The Library of Congress, which houses the collection, has, remarkably, digitized all the negatives and tagged the records with loads of data, such as who took the picture and where it was taken.

Source & Full Story

World War I: Australian Teenage Girl Maud Butler Cut Hair, Dressed as Soldier and Stowed Away on Troopship

A teenage girl from the Hunter Valley coalfields was so desperate to be a part of Australia's war effort that she cut her hair, dressed as a soldier and stowed away on a troopship.

The exploits of Maud Butler, a resourceful 16-year-old waitress with a sense of adventure, are being researched by historian Professor Victoria Haskins. As part of her study, Professor Haskins is researching Maud's expedition, which she says runs several chapters. Here, Professor Haskins writes about Maud's initial run-in with authorities.

Source & Full Story

3 September 2014

War Against Japan Archives Cover Disastrous Defense of Nanking

The eighth part of an archive series on the Second Sino-Japanese War on Monday covered the Battle of Nanking (Nanjing) in 1937, in which Japanese troops captured the Republic of China capital and unleashed a six-week orgy of slaughter.

Starting on Aug. 25, the archive series is being released on the website of China's State Archives Administration, one battle per day, in a drive to raise awareness of the war, known in China as the War of Resistance Against Japan.

Source & Full Story

2 September 2014

More than 750 Korean War Remains Found this Year

The South Korean military has excavated this year the remains of 753 fallen soldiers who fought in the 1950-53 Korean War, the defense ministry said Monday.

In a four-month project that began in April to find remains of missing service personnel, some 46,000 soldiers dug out sites in 56 regions across the country to recover the bodies, according to the ministry.

Source & Full Story

1 September 2014

London’s Imperial War Museum Revisits Horrors of World War I

For the next four years, Britain will commemorate in a wide-ranging series of events and programs the centenary of the country’s entry into the First World War on Aug. 4, 1914, when it declared war against Germany.

“The centerpiece of our commemorations,” in the words of Prime Minister David Cameron, is the renovation of the Imperial War Museum London.

Source & Full Story

Woman Unearths Past of Forgotten Arizona Indian Cemetery

A dusty, barren field in the shadow of a busy Arizona interstate was for decades a place where children played freely, teenagers spooked themselves on Halloween and locals dumped trash, seemingly unaware of the history beneath them.

Inside cotton sacks, burlap bags and blankets buried in the ground are the remains dating back to the 1930s of stillborn babies, tuberculosis patients, and sick and malnourished Native Americans from Winslow and the nearby Navajo and Hopi reservations.

Source & Full Story

Archives New Zealand and National Library Open the Files on the First World War

More than 141,000 First World War service files are now available online, adding to the wealth of information detailing New Zealanders experience of the war made available by Archives New Zealand and the National Library.

In possibly the largest and most complicated digitisation project in New Zealand’s history, Archives New Zealand staff identified over 141,000 First World War files, scanned the often crumbling, fragile pages and then digitised them and published them online.

Source & Full Story

How To Link Pictures Uploaded by Other Geneanet Members To A Person In Your Family Tree?

You have found a family picture or a photograph of headstone on Geneanet, and you would like to link it to a person in your family tree.

On Geneanet, you can view for free all of the pictures that have been uploaded by other members, and you can link them to your family tree.

Here's how to do it:

Continue reading...