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Genealogy Blog

31 October 2014

Participate in the 'GeneaGraves Weekend' on November 15-16, 2014

A few weeks ago, Geneanet has launched the GeneaGraves mobile app for Android and iOS. With this app, you can easily take pictures of graves and upload them into Geneanet. Then, these pictures are free for every Geneanet member.

Pictures can also be attached to any person in the Geneanet family tree. That show our involvement in the free and collaborative genealogy.

To formally launch this new service, we will organise the 'GeneaGraves Weekend' for all of our members worldwide. On November 15-16, 2014, take pictures of graves in a nearby cemetery!

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30 October 2014

Genealogy Software Updates of the Week

Brother's Keeper 7.0.34 (Full Featured - Windows - Purchase)

• Fixed a problem in Gedom Import caused by version 7.0.33 for the first 10 marriages imported.
• Fixed a problem when adding a brand new database, where the first links to a spouse did not show up unless you picked File, Re-Index Database.

GEDexplorer for Android 1.10 (Mobile - Purchase)

• The split view can now also be turned on in portrait orientation.
• Added support for more events and attributes (education, nationality, graduation, retirement, emigration, immigration, naturalization, census, engagement and annulment).
• All events and attributes that contain a date are now shown in chronological order under "Events". Those without a date are shown under "Attributes".
• Added support for Samsung Multi Window (available on many Samsung devices).

GedFamilies for iPhone & iPad 2.0.1 (Mobile - Purchase)

• Bug fixes.

GRAMPS 4.1.1 (Full Featured - Linux - Freeware/Open Source)

• Fix custom place types in the place editor.
• Allow place type combobox to receive focus.
• Store custom place types in the metadata table.
• Fix place type for places without a main location.
• Fix bug adding parent places to a new place.
• And much more.

MacFamilyTree 7.3.1 (Full Featured - Mac - Purchase)

• Graphical glitch displaying charts corrected.
• Localization issues corrected.
• M4a audio files can now be added to the database.
• Other smaller fixes.

MobileFamilyTree for iPhone and iPad 7.3.1 (Mobile - Purchase)

• Graphical glitch displaying charts corrected.
• Localization issues corrected.
• Other smaller fixes.

Second Site 5.3 Build 2 (Web Publishing - Windows - Purchase)

• Added the Post-Make Site Batch File capability.
• Documented a previously hidden feature, External Command entries in the Utilities menu.
• Changed the width computation for checkbox properties in the main Second Site window to make them narrower.

End of the Line: The Rusting Relics of an Eerie Hungarian Train Graveyard, Including Carriages That Carried Jews To Their Deaths at Auschwitz

These are the eerie images of an abandoned train yard in Hungary where visitors can see rotting carriages once used by the Nazis to transport hundreds of thousands of Jews to their deaths at Auschwitz concentration camp.

The pictures, taken at the Istvantelek train workshop near Budapest, are a snapshot of a bygone era, with huge locomotives standing in a crumbling shed that is slowly being reclaimed by nature.

Source & Full Story

29 October 2014

Portraits of Wounded Soldiers from the Civil War

With a death toll estimated somewhere between 600k and 750k, the American Civil War was without a doubt the bloodiest conflict in U.S. history. But even the soldiers who made it out alive didn’t always do so without sustaining serious injuries.

On its Flickr page, the US National Library of Medicine has shared a handful of portraits that depict the war-torn bodies of soldiers who fought through the war.

Source & Full Story

Bursary To Expand Archive of Irish in first World War

A bursary scheme to allow Irish university students to research Ireland’s involvement in the first World War was announced yesterday by Minister for Arts, Heritage and the Gaeltacht Heather Humphreys in the Flemish town of Ypres, as representatives of more than 80 countries gathered in Flanders to commemorate the war.

The scheme, which will begin next year and run until 2018, will allow five university students from Ireland to spend the summer months at the In Flanders Fields Museum in Ypres.

Source & Full Story

Amelia Earhart Plane Fragment Identified

A fragment of Amelia Earhart's lost aircraft has been identified to a high degree of certainty for the first time ever since her plane vanished over the Pacific Ocean on July 2, 1937, in a record attempt to fly around the world at the equator.

New research strongly suggests that a piece of aluminum aircraft debris recovered in 1991 from Nikumaroro, an uninhabited atoll in the southwestern Pacific republic of Kiribati, does belong to Earhart’s twin-engined Lockheed Electra.

Source & Full Story

Civil War Time Capsule Found During Street Repairs in Richmond, Indiana

Sometimes street repairs can reveal unexpected things.

With South E Street being dug up for major changes, Thomas Owens, owner of the former firehouse on the southwest corner of South Ninth and E streets, decided it was necessary to protect an important asset — a monument marking the site as the location of the Civil War-era Camp Wayne.

Source & Full Story

28 October 2014

WWII Pilot Found Buried in Italian Corn Field

The remains of an Italian WWII pilot who died in a dogfight with U.S. pilots 70 years ago have finally been unearthed -- still sitting on the parachute in the cockpit.

Found 13 feet underground with the wreckage of his crashed plane, a Macchi C.205 Veltro, the pilot was identified as being Lieutenant Guerrino Bortolani. His plane literately disappeared in the Padua countryside in northern Italy, planting itself deep in the bank of a ditch as it crashed on March 11, 1944.

Source & Full Story

WWI Trenches Discovered in Kent, England

A forgotten First World War trench system which was part of Britain’s home defences has been discovered. The fortifications stretched for more than 11 miles on the Isle of Sheppey in Kent and protected the Thames Estuary against German invasion.

It became known as Barbed Wire Island and was a restricted area with residents given identity cards dubbed the Sheppey Passport. To leave the island locals had to get the document signed by police with checkpoints in place at the bridge and the railway station.

Source & Full Story

27 October 2014

Over 800,000 Pages of British Mental Health Records To Go Online

The Wellcome Library has announced that it is funding the scanning of over 800,000 pages of material relating to psychiatric hospitals across the UK, including the York Retreat, Crichton Royal Hospital and the Camberwell House Asylum.

Made possible thanks to partnerships with repositories including Dumfries and Galloway Council Archives and London Metropolitan Archives, the project will see the digitisation of patient records, case notes and registers dating back to the 18th century.

Source & Full Story

MI5 Spied on Leading British Historians for Decades, Secret Files Reveal

MI5 amassed hundreds of records on Eric Hobsbawm and Christopher Hill, two of Britain’s leading historians who were both once members of the Communist party, secret files have revealed.

The scholars were subjected to persistent surveillance for decades as MI5 and police special branch officers tapped and recorded their telephone calls, intercepted their private correspondence and monitored their contacts, the files show. Some of the surveillance gave MI5 more details about their targets’ personal lives than any threat to national security.

Source & Full Story

WWI Soldiers' Final Resting Places Recognised in Tasmania 100 Years After Deployment

Tasmanian WWI diggers have been recognised as war veterans with the installation of new headstones honouring their service.

It is 100 years since the SS Geelong left Hobart bound for war and it is hoped that the installation of the war headstones would give families a permanent place to remember loved ones.

Source & Full Story

History and Genealogy Treasures Online at Guinness Storehouse in Dublin, Ireland

The Guinness Archive, housed by the Guinness Storehouse in Dublin, collects, preserves and makes accessible records and artifacts from the formation of the company in 1759 to the present day, including 20,000 individual personnel records of past employees.

The foundation document of the Guinness Archive is the 9,000 year lease signed by Arthur Guinness on the St. James’s Gate Brewery in 1759.

Source & Full Story

Are You Related to John Cleese?

Cleese was born on October 27, 1939 in Weston-super-Mare, Somerset, England, the only child of Reginald Francis Cleese, an insurance salesman, and his wife Muriel Evelyn (née Cross). His family's surname was originally Cheese, but his father had thought it was embarrassing and changed it when he enlisted in the Army during World War I.

Cleese was educated at St Peter's Preparatory School, where he received a prize for English studies and did well at cricket and boxing. When he was 13, he was awarded an exhibition at Clifton College, an English public school in Bristol.

John Cleese's Family Tree

24 October 2014

The National Archive Seeks To Compile the List of Armenian Genocide Victims

A century ago the world was caught in the clutches of the First World War, and the Armenians did not stay apart. The Armenian Genocide was also the direct consequence of WWI.

The Armenian National Archive has prepared a Russian book titled "The Participation of Armenians in the First World War," which was published in Moscow. A three-volume publication titled "The Armenian Genocide in Ottoman Turkey" has also been released.

Source & Full Story

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