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17 October 2014

10 Things You Didn’t Know Were Canadian World War I Memorials

When we think of war memorials, we picture cenotaphs, statues of angels and soldiers, but after the First World War, communities searched for original ways to honour their fallen citizens.

Some took the traditional route, while others came up with other methods to memorialize the dead. Here are 10 places and things that you may not realize were meant to honour Canada’s war dead.

Source & Full Story

Library and Archives Canada: Soldiers of the First World War

The digitization of 640,000 Canadian Expeditionary Force personnel service files is under way. This project aims to provide access to high-quality digital copies of all service files, anytime and anywhere.

To achieve this goal, LAC will be required to close portions of this collection as they undergo preparation, conservation, and digitization. LAC will not grant requests for direct consultation or copying of the records during these stages

Source & Full Story

25 August 2014

20,000 Irishmen Fought for Canada in World War I

Almost 20,000 Irish soldiers fought in the Canadian army during World War I new figures show. According to an unpublished document from Canada’s Department of National Defense, 19,327 Irish served in the Canadian Expeditionary Force.

However, the Irish Times reports that number may be underestimated as many Irish who enlisted in the army came from across US border and would have been regarded as American. Canada went out of its way to recruit Irish soldiers and a number of Irish battalions were raised during the war.

Source & Full Story

7 July 2014

Canadiana Organization Putting Canadian History Online

The shelves are literally groaning under the weight of cartloads of microfilm at Canadiana, an organization working to create a massive digital library of Canadian history.

Established in 1978, the organization was involved in creating the same cartloads of microfilm images of documents from Library and Archives Canada. Since the early 2000s, it has kept pace with new technology, continuing its partnership with the library by digitizing documents and the already-created microfilms.

Source & Full Story

30 May 2014

Are You Related to Alanis Morissette?

Morissette was born June 1, 1974 in Ottawa, Canada, the daughter of Georgia Mary Ann (née Feuerstein), a teacher, and Alan Richard Morissette, a high school principal.

She has two siblings, one of whom is a twin brother, Wade Morissette (also a musician), who was born 12 minutes after her. Her father was of French-Canadian and Irish descent and her mother was of Hungarian ancestry. Morissette had a Catholic upbringing. She attended Holy Family Catholic School for elementary school and Immaculata High School for Grades 7 and 8 before completing the rest of her high school at Glebe Collegiate Institute (Ottawa, Canada).

Alanis Morissette's Family Tree

15 April 2014

Government of Canada Announces Appointment to Library and Archives Canada

Minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages Shelly Glover today announced the appointment of Guy Berthiaume as Librarian and Archivist of Canada for a term of five years, effective June 23, 2014.

"Having a person of Dr. Berthiaume's calibre leading Library and Archives Canada will be a solid asset to the organization. His extensive experience in the management of large cultural organizations and his strong leadership are important qualifications for this position." said Shelly Glover, Minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages.

Source & Full Story

10 April 2014

Canada: Was Someone on Your Street Killed During WWI’s Battle of Vimy Ridge?

It’s been 97 years since the First World War Battle of Vimy Ridge, which began with a Canadian attack on April 9, 1917. The battle was a milestone for Canada, marking the first time that all the Canadian divisions in France had fought together as an independent formation.

In the larger picture, Vimy Ridge was part of a pattern of events that showed Canada’s growing independence from Britain, something that took place gradually over decades.

Source & Full Story

2 April 2014

Library and Archives Canada Moves To Outsource National Catalogue

Library and Archives Canada is outsourcing AMICUS, the venerable free national catalogue that lists and describes its holdings and those of more than 1,300 libraries across Canada.

LAC proposes to use a sole-source contract to hire U.S.-based Online Computer Library Centre Inc. (OCLC), the world’s largest library co-operative, to replace the outdated system. Library and Archives signalled the long-anticipated move by publishing a detailed advance contract award notice on the government’s tender website last week.

Source & Full Story

28 March 2014

Library and Archives Canada (LAC) Is Launching a Photo Set of Alberta Residential Schools

Library and Archives Canada (LAC) is launching a single portal to provide access to photos related to Residential Schools, taken between 1885 and 1996. Some 150,000 Aboriginal children attended over 130 residential schools located across the country.

The first set of published photos comprises about 65 images associated with the Residential Schools of Alberta. LAC will add photos for the other provinces and territories as they become available. The Residential Schools Photos page will make it easy to select the province or territory of your choice, and save or print the images you wish to view.

Source & Full Story

17 March 2014

Man Finds Letters from a WWI Soldier Under His Bertmount Ave. Porch in Leslieville, Canada

On a cold Saturday in France a few days before Christmas, Leslie George Currell wrote a letter home to his sister, Gertrude, on Bertmount Ave. in Toronto. It was a cold winter in 1917, the frost on the trees an inch thick, the ground coated with snow.

“I can hardly realize that Tuesday is Xmas,” wrote the 24-year-old private in the Canadian Expeditionary Force fighting in World War I. “We were just talking about it today, the ground was white with snow but still it did not seem like the time of year it is. I presume you are all busy getting ready for it, tonight. I would like to be home for the day.”

Source & Full Story

28 February 2014

Tombstone from 1870s Turns Up in Guelph (Canada) Antique Shop

How did a tombstone belonging to a child who was buried in the Elora Cemetery in 1878, make its way to a Guelph antique store? And how is Ray Mitchell to figure out the rightful owner of this tombstone that's 136 years old?

The tombstone is for William John French, son of Frederick and Elizabeth French, who died Oct. 15, 1878 at the age of two. He was buried in the Elora Cemetery in a family plot originally purchased by Josias French in 1864.

Source & Full Story

25 February 2014

Canada: DNA Test Identifies Missing Saskatchewan Soldier in German Grave

The mystery of a Saskatchewan-born Second World War soldier who was mistakenly buried with Nazi soldiers appears to have been solved. DNA testing of the remains indicate they are indeed those of Lawrence S. Gordon of Eastend, a private first class in the U.S. Army who was missing and presumed dead following a battle in France in 1944.

His body was never found. Family members aided by historians and well-wishers tracked down his suspected remains to a cemetery in Normandy, France that's administered by the German government.

Source & Full Story

14 February 2014

Note From 1916 Discovered Behind a Fireplace Is Finally Delivered to WWI Seaman's Great Granddaughter

A forgotten letter from a mystery First World War sailor has found its way to his granddaughter after almost a century. The note dated 1916 was discovered behind a fireplace in Kirkwall, Orkney, and signed ‘Your Blue Jacket Boy’.

Addressed to the serviceman’s family, it was sealed and stamped but never posted. Staff at Orkney Library hoped to identify the letter writer and launched an appeal on their blog. The hunt spread to Canada, where a distant relative suggested the sailor might be David John Phillips from Llanelli, South Wales.

Source & Full Story

30 January 2014

Black Death and Justinian’s Plague Were Caused By The Same Pathogen, Scientists Find

Two of the world’s deadliest pandemics – Justinian’s Plague and the Black Death – were caused by the same pathogen. These findings were revealed yesterday in an article published in the journal Lancet Infectious Diseases.

The researchers, who include scientists from McMaster University in Canada, the University of Sydney and Northern Arizona University, were able to gather minuscule plague DNA fragments from the 1,500-year-old teeth of two victims of Justinian’s plague, buried in Bavaria, Germany.

Source & Full Story

17 January 2014

British Government Accused of 'Social Engineering' Over WW1 Plans

Ministers have been accused of “social engineering” over their plans to mark the centenary of the First World War, by downplaying the role of Australian and New Zealand soldiers in favour of the contribution from New Commonwealth nations.

Critics claim the government is focusing on black and Asian servicemen from other parts of the British Empire, such as India, as well as Caribbean and West African nations, at the expense of the Anzac forces, along with those from Canada and South Africa. They have accused British ministers of “political correctness” and a “whitewashing” of history.

Source & Full Story

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